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National Bird Project - Vote for Canada's National Bird
National Bird Project - Vote for Canada's National Bird

Songbirds

Common raven (Corvus corax)

Votes: 1680


Common raven
Photo illustration: Canadian Geographic; Photo: Bombtime / Wikicommons

This large corvid is entirely black, with a thick neck, shaggy throat feathers and a sharp beak. They are omnivorous, opportunistic eaters, and live year-round in every province and territory.

*Territorial bird of the Yukon

IDENTIFICATION
(Both Sexes)
Weight 0.7-1.6 kg
Length 56-69 cm
Wingspan 1.16-1.18 m
Common raven range map
Range map courtesy iBird for Windows
Click to enlarge

Vote for the Common raven for Canada’s National Bird


Essays

Comments and essays appear in the language in which they were submitted

Well, I would choose this bird: the first off Noah's ark, the subject of stories (our stories), and a storyteller too. Raven, charting the course Canada's first inhabitants later took, crossed the Bering Strait to arrive here. And if that pedigree, one that precedes this country's mere statehood, is not enough, consider too the importance this corvid has had in native stories ever since. Raven is Trickster. Raven is family. Raven can be found from sea to sea to sea, and beyond, so that inevitably, and like the Canadian, Raven is an internationalist, too. In truth, we share the mythology of Raven with other countries and their histories — those of Europe and Scandinavia, mostly — though perhaps it is we who understand Raven best. Raven is not pretty, elegant or graceful, though we know him to be smart and mischievous, and do not generally demonize the bird — as, for instance, many Scots have done since, in 1424, King James I decreed it to be vermin.

Misguided others would rather not heed the noisy chatter of a bird easily disregarded, and is this not the condition of the Canadian citizen in the world?

Above all, Raven is resourceful, a survivor, as the territory compels most Canadians to be. He stores his food in caches, a habit of the land — though really I shouldn't be saying "he" as, consistent with our progressive laws, Trickster also stands outside of gender. Raven is playful — makes toys! — and uses the kluk-kluk and kaw of a language that can often sound like an aboriginal one to tell his companions where his hoardings are. (Is Raven the mimic, or are we?) And even this tendency — to take to the road out of necessity and then return home and relate the things he's seen — is an atavistic Canadian one of hunting and gathering. From the first Thule hunters to the Newfoundlanders of today travelling to Alberta to hunt and gather work, it has been the Canadian's lot to scour the land for opportunity, and then to bring home a tall tale or two.

Oh, there may be more beautiful and mellifluous contenders, but no other bird can really make so quintessential a Canadian case.

Noah Richler is the author of This Is My Country, What's Yours? A Literary Atlas of Canada and What We Talk About When We Talk About War. He lives in Toronto.

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The Raven is the senator of the bird life in our Canadian forests, mountain meadows and coastal shores, it is in our cities and suburbs. Ornithologically, they have distant cousins that include crows, jays, nutcrackers and magpies. They are also popular in other parts of the earth such as Australia, Europe, North Africa, Greece, India, China, Japan, Western Siberia, Greenland, Scandinavia, and North America.

Stemming from the north to the south and the east to the west ravens are very family-oriented birds and communal in nature. Bold and true, you might not notice but they see you when they fly overhead. They will call out to you in a distinctive "deep, harsh croak" or honk.

I feed them in my yard and they watch over our neighbourhood. I leave them shiny objects at their watering dish because they like to adorn their nests with them and will deliver them to their mates during breeding season. Once a bird from the flock that was injured kept returning, walking into my yard to find food so I left for it fruit, vegetable scraps, a hard boiled egg etc.

Healthy ravens prefer the carrion of roadkill, rodents or shellfish, insects, berries and grain they are also known to hide and store food for use later. Ravens are one of the only birds in my neighbourhood that interact with humans in a somewhat interesting manner. For example in return for leaving food and water out for them, they keep an eye out, and when I leave my house, the raven will call out from a perch or the road with "a dry grating Kraa"; coincidently the number of distinct cries the raven reports is directly related to the number of people directly within the close vicinity of my house.

Ravens are acrobatic and agile flyers. They can take on many forms in the air - soaring, tumbling and rolling in their playful flight patterns and have a terrific sense of confidence because of their above average black wingspan. Bold and brave, yet cautious and considerate. Rarely are rarely seen alone. Ravens are often seen rolling through the skies "in playful flight patterns" like a group meandering Sopwith Camels. They even have a complex vocabulary and have even been taught to speak. Ravens have been the attention of poets and scholars.

To Native Americans, it is guardian of ceremonial magic and healing circles. In England, tombstones are sometimes called "ravenstones". Symbolically the raven is a contrary spirit. Negatively, the raven represents the profane, the devil, evil spirits, the trickster and thief, the void, yet, in many cultures the raven symbolizes the mystery of the unknown, creation, healing, wisdom, protection, and prophecy. Overall ravens are considered more help than harm.

* In The Audobon Society Encyclopedia of North American Birds, ornithologist John Terres writes, "Corvids have probably achieved the highest degree of intelligence to be found in any birds." Animal behaviorist Konrad Lorenz agrees, writing that raven has the "highest mental development" among the avian species. Naturalist Tony Angell has proven in controlled laboratory experiments that ravens are "superior in intelligence to all other avian species tested." Irene Pepperberg, of the University of Arizona, has gone even further, stating that corvids share "the cognitive capacities of many primates."

"If men had wings and bore black feathers, few of them would be clever enough to be crows." - Rev. Henry Ward Beecher. In Beowulf, an Anglo Saxon poem, is written " . . . craving for carrion, the dark raven shall have its say, and tell the eagle how it fared at the feast, when, competing with the wolf, it laid bare the bones of corpses.". Don Quixote in Cervantes wrote “… this king did not die, but was changed by magic art into a raven, and that in process of time he is to return to reign and recover his kingdom and scepter; for which reason it cannot be proved that from that time to this any Englishman ever killed a raven?"

A tale told by Aesop informs us that the intelligence of corvids has long been known. A thirsty crow found a pitcher of water, but the water was too far below the rim for his beak to reach. The clever crow began dropping pebbles into the pitcher, raising the water level until it reached the brim, where she could quench her thirst.

At Oxford University, ornithologists conducted an unusual experiment with two Caledonian Crows the Journal of Science. A tiny bucket of meat was placed inside a pipe, and two pieces of wire were left in their cage, one hooked and one straight. This study of the crows reported, when one crow stole the hooked wire from the other, and rather than giving up, the other crow "modified" the straight wire into a hooked wire, and was thus able to hook the bucket, pull it up, and retrieve her snack. This elevates ravens from "tool users" to "tool makers", which places them on a par with primates.

The Raven has been my longtime favourite Canadian bird - a friend, jokester and guide for me from the NWT and from B.C. to N.S. !!!

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GO RAVENS: VOTE EARLY AND VOTE OFTEN FOR CANADA’S NATIONAL BIRD
from EDGEYK.com

Picture this: it’s bird prom night and over 450 different species are squawking their way around the gymnasium ahead of the big announcement of bird prom king or queen. The Common Loon is strutting confidently. “I’m so handsome, I have to win,” he says, “and I’m on the Loonie.” Canada Goose, she’s looking beautiful as always. “I have Canada in my name,” she says smugly, “and they named a jacket after me.”

Raven is hanging out in the bathroom smoking cigarettes. It’s not like he cares.

The big moment comes. The bespectacled great horned owl flutters up to the microphone. “The winner is… Raven!” she says with astonishment.

He must have stuffed the box, that trickster.

That’s pretty much the scenario Yellowknife city councillor Dan Wong is hoping for (minus the ballot stuffing) in Canada’s great ornithological popularity contest. The Royal Canadian Geographical Society is hosting an online vote to pick a national bird ahead of the country’s 150th anniversary in 2017. Wong, and Whitehorse city councillor John Streicker, are trying to get Northerners to vote en masse for the northern bird.

“The raven is a resilient, adaptable and intelligent bird and I think that summarizes Canadians,” says Wong. “There is the ptarmigan. They’re pretty awesome and cute, and also very tasty. But I’d be surprised if other Canadians know what a ptarmigan is.”

Wong and his pro-raven friends have their work cut out. Right now, the common loon, with its PR head start courtesy of the Canadian Mint, is leading the flock with around 6,750 votes. It is followed by the snowy owl, the grey jay and the rather obvious Canada goose, all with over 2,000 votes. The raven is currently nestled down around 1,000.

“A lot of people try to demonize the raven, call it mischievous and inelegant, so I think the raven is due for a serious public relations boost,” said Wong.

Why go raven?

Well, for one thing, they’re almost everywhere in the country. And who wouldn’t want our civic bird, and the source of most of our power outages, as our national bird?

Then there’s the raven’s first-rate mythological pedigree. In many Inuit and First Nations stories, the raven is the creator of the world or the being who brings light. That said, in many stories he’s also a trickster driven by insatiable greed — perhaps not the image Canadians want to cultivate following an impressive win for the worst environmental record in the developed world.

Further afield, a raven was the first bird off of Noah’s Ark. And according to rabbinical tradition, ravens were one of only three couples on the ark to get frisky, to Noah’s prudish consternation. Sexually liberated? That’s what people say about Canadians, right?

Despite the raven’s mere 1,000 votes, the bird is getting some illustrious support. Noah Richler, son of Mordecai Richler, has come to its defense on the Canadian Geographical Society website: “Above all, Raven is resourceful, a survivor, as the territory compels most Canadians to be… [The] tendency — to take to the road out of necessity and then return home and relate the things he’s seen — is an atavistic Canadian one of hunting and gathering. From the first Thule hunters to the Newfoundlanders of today travelling to Alberta to hunt and gather work, it has been the Canadian’s lot to scour the land for opportunity, and then to bring home a tall tale or two.”

Why the raven might win

Along with the slightly un-Canadian mythological association with trickiness and fecundity, in reality ravens don’t act like the stereotypical mild-mannered Canadian at all.

According to an article from natureworldnews.com, “It appears that ravens may be even more viciously political than your average high school drama queen. That’s at least according to a new study of these highly intelligent birds, who appear to have a social system that’s characterized by alliances, betrayal, and sabotage between ‘friends.'”

Apparently, raven society is a bit like 18th-century England: food, mating privileges and protection are all distributed within strictly defined hierarchies. When lower-class ravens try mingling beyond their means, other ravens are quick to attack them and put them back in their place.

That doesn’t seem to square with the common self-perception of Canada as a relatively equal place (however, deluded that may be). But, hey I’m sure common loons are mean-spirited too.

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Reasons for my choice:

The Raven is one of the most highly intelligent birds, sharing some features only found with humans. It is found all across Canada, and has great first nations significance - It's cultural and mythological status is world wide. In the Jewish, Christian and Islamic traditions, the raven was the first animal to be released from Noah's Ark.

I think we should claim it as our own. The loon has many votes, but it is already Ontario's bird as well as one of the northern state's.

The common raven evolved in the Old World and crossed the Bering land bridge into North America. They have been on the planet for about two million years and ravens have coexisted with humans for thousands of years. Part of their success as a species is due to their omnivorous diet; they are extremely versatile and opportunistic in finding sources of nutrition, feeding on carrion, insects, cereal grains, berries, fruit, small animals, and food waste.

Over the centuries, it has been the subject of mythology, folklore, art, and literature. In many cultures, including the indigenous cultures of Scandinavia, ancient Ireland and Wales, Bhutan, the northwest coast of North America, and Siberia and northeast Asia, the common raven has been revered as a spiritual figure or god."

Some notable feats of problem-solving provide evidence that the common raven is unusually intelligent. Like other corvids, ravens can mimic sounds from their environment, including human speech.Furthermore, there has been research suggesting that the common raven is involved in seed dispersal. In the wild, the common raven chooses the best habitat and disperses seeds in locations best suited for its survival.

Crows, ravens, magpies, and jays are not just feathered machines, rigidly programmed by their genetics. Instead, they are beings that, within the constraints of their molecular inheritance, make complex decisions and show every sign of enjoying a rich awareness.

The brains of common ravens count among the largest of any bird species. Specifically, their hyperpallium is large, for a bird. They display ability in problem solving, as well as other cognitive processes such as imitation and insight.[74]

Linguist Derek Bickerton, building on the work of Bernd Heinrich, has recently argued that ravens are one of only four known animals (the others being bees, ants, and humans) who have demonstrated displacement, the capacity to communicate about objects or events that are distant in space or time from the communication. Young, unmated common ravens roost together at night, but usually forage alone during the day. However, when one discovers a large carcass guarded by a pair of adult ravens, he will return to the roost and communicate his find. The next day, a flock of young ravens will fly to the carcass, and chase off the adults. Bickerton argues that the advent of linguistic displacement was perhaps the most important event in the evolution of human language, and that ravens are the only other vertebrate to share this with humans.

Common ravens have been observed calling wolves to the site of dead animals. The wolves open the carcass, leaving the scraps more accessible to the birds.

Ravens are 'inventors', implying that they can solve problems. Many of the feats of common ravens were formerly argued to be stereotyped innate behaviour, but it now has been established that their aptitudes for solving problems individually and learning from each other reflect a flexible capacity for intelligent insight unusual among non-human animals.

Play

There has been increasing recognition of the extent to which birds engage in play. Juvenile common ravens are among the most playful of bird species. They have been observed to slide down snowbanks, apparently purely for fun. They even engage in games with other species, such as playing catch-me-if-you-can with wolves, otters and dogs. Common ravens are known for spectacular aerobatic displays, such as flying in loops or interlocking talons with each other in flight.

They are also one of only a few wild animals who make their own toys. They have been observed breaking off twigs to play with socially.

Let's vote for this unique wonderful bird!

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Raven would be the perfect choice - for its ability to survive everywhere in Canada in all seasons, for its creativity and playfulness, its intelligence and its fidelity. The raw power of the raven's cry which splits the silent sky and and the many subtle and not so subtle intonations and variations found in Raven's conversation are complex and fascinating. There is no mistaking Raven for any other bird - ever. Raven is definitive in ability, sound and very dramatic appearance.

The beautiful, unique street signs in Norman Wells, NWT - (all black metal Ravens in different poses- perched or flying) automatically bring a smile of recognition to anyone who sees them. Canadians respond to this bird because deep within us there is something that instinctively KNOWS Raven is a quintessential symbol of Canada.

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Raven black,
Eyeway, highway,
On into the brain.
Protein rich,
Feathers glisten,
Nourish and sustain.
Paired in rocks,
Secure above,
Forever shall remain.

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The Common raven is a bird with presence. It's large, black feathery-frame, shines and shimmers, playing on the eyes a question of what is known and what is seen. Is he black or dark brown? Is he a crow or a raven?

Questions as unremarkable as the confusion they cause. Still, he creates an interest just by being. That, in itself, is remarkable.

He is company to the Canadian clouds and caregiver, inhabitant to the trees and forests throughout our beautiful country.

Reliable and accountable. Beautiful and mystical. He carries stories of contributions and retributions, soaring high and wide to deliver his messages to their rightful owners.

He is the coming together of what is and what can be without preaching or forcing his ways to those who don't even see him there. If you don't see him then you are not ready to see him.

A teacher of discovery and openness. He waits on his students readiness.

The skies, forests, trees and landscapes of Canada are the stage for his performances and a platform for his rich tales. He acts in truth - naturally.

He represents integrity, curiosity and an other-worldliness alike the Canada we know and love.

A country that represents and respects beauty and mystic! Allowing the eye of the beholder the quest of a lifetime.

Canada has it all and offers even more - to those willing to see!

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If the Canadian Geographic National Bird Project is a popularity contest then I know that the Common Raven will not win. It is however the most deserving species.
This Raven’s resourcefulness, intelligence and geographic range speak to this. Does any other national bird candidate center its continental range to virtually the entire country? Many species are widespread but do they live here for the entire year? Or do they run for warmer climes when the mercury drops…
How many of the candidates can thrive, year-round, in habitats ranging from the treeless tundra to our urban centers? One might argue that the Canada Goose can but will you find a Canada Goose in the tundra in January?
And what about the graceful diver found on our one dollar coin? Many people wax poetic about the loon’s yodelling call but can that song be heard from December until ice-out? In winter, Canada’s definitive season, the only “loonies” found throughout most of the country are in our pockets.
But the Raven is here. Year round. It was here when our first peoples walked across the Bering Strait land bridge. They knew the Raven was special and they honored it in their mythology. So too did their old-world cousins, the Celts, Romans, Scandinavians and Siberian tribes to name a few.
The Raven is the best possible symbol of what we Canadians SHOULD be. `Tough, resourceful and intelligent. Are these worthy national attributes? How about playful, graceful and strong? Ravens are all those things. VOTE RAVEN.
The alternative is to go with a species that runs from the cold or is found only in a part of the country. Is that the kind of Canadian you want to be? VOTE RAVEN — the truly Canadian bird.

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The Raven is the bird of legend, revered by Aboriginals for its cleverness, by the old Norse as a symbol of wisdom, and by those of us today for its intellect and curiosity. It is not as pestering as the crow, nor as arrogant as the eagle. It watches, and speaks in many tongues, like the many cultures of this land. Of all the birds chosen, they are the only ones who live throughout Canada with a stubborn determination against the cold, year round.

Any who have seen these acrobatic birds soaring, diving, and looping up and down the mountain peaks can attest to their daring joy.

Unlike the loon, who sits comfortably in Canada's many lakes, the raven spreads its wings to explore all the vast wilderness From lake to ocean, from prairie to peak, from tree to glacier. And so it is that the raven exemplifies Canada as it should be. Community in the sparsely populated land, adventure in the rugged wilderness, wisdom in decisions, resourcefulness, and above all, the ability to take joy in that which others may take for granted.

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For too long has stigma surrounded the image of a raven. The dark mythology surrounding this bird should not prevent it's consideration for Canada's national bird.

If you consider the quintessential Canadian birds, one might think of the raven, eagle, common loon, Canada goose, great grey owl, snowy owl, or even the ring-billed gull. Now, of these birds, only the raven, eagle, great grey owl, and snowy owl remain in Canada year-round. Can a bird be called Canadian if it cannot brave our winters? Most Canadians would consider winter to be a central facet of the Canadian identity. Therefore, our representative bird must also exemplify this.

The eagle is simply not an option, as choosing it would most certainly draw disdain from Canadians and Americans alike as unoriginal.

Both the great grey owl and snowy owl would be great choices. I mean, the snowy owl flys north to breed, NORTH! And while to most the snowy owl might seem the obvious choice of the two, the majesty and of the great grey owl puts it over the top for me. The largest owl in Canada, with distinctive large discs for a face, perched on a bare tree branch in winter paints a near-perfect picture of Canada's bird. The great grey owl was indeed a supremely close second (in fact, I argue for the raven mainly because I think it will probably be overlooked for the very reasons I like it, and someones gotta stand up for them).

The raven, despite having a wide distribution (thus being less unique to Canada) is the most intriguing choice. Perhaps the smartest bird on the list, these birds are highly adaptable, and opportunistic generalists. They can be found in pretty much anywhere, urban or rural, north and south. Not quite the nuisance as the ring-billed gull (or so-termed s**t hawk), the ominous and foreboding associations of this bird would add great mystique to Canada's image.

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Ravens are considered royal birds. Legend has it King Arthur turned into one.
Alexander the Great was supposedly guided across the desert by two ravens sent from heaven.
It is the official bird of the Yukon and of the city of Yellowknife, Northwest Territories.
Raven has appeared in the mythology of many ancient people. Some of the more common stories are from those of Greek, Celtic, Norse, Pacific Northwest, and Roman mythology.

In legend, the Raven was a white bird, Apollo sent a white raven to spy on his lover, Coronis. When the raven brought back the news that Coronis has been unfaithful to him, Apollo scorcher the raven in his fury, turning the animal’s feathers black. That’s why all ravens are black today.

The raven also has a prominent role in the mythologies of the Indigenous peoples of the Pacific Northwest Coast, including the Tsimishian, Haida, Heiltsuk, Tlingit, kwakwaka’wakw, Coast Salish, Koyukons, and Inuit. The raven in these indigenous peoples’ mythology is the Creator of the world, bringing the world into being and who is sometimes considered to be the individual who brought light to the darkness. When the Great Spirit created all things he kept them separate and stored in cedar boxes. The Great Spirit gifted these boxes to the animals who existed before humans. When the animals opened the boxes all the things that comprise the world came into being. The boxes held such things as mountains, fire, water, wind and seeds for all the plants. One such box, which was given to Seagull, contained all the light of the world. Seagull coveted his box and refused to open it, clutching it under his wing. All the people asked Raven to persuade Seagull to open it and release the light. Despite begging, demanding, flattering and trying to trick him into opening the box, Seagull still refused. Finally Raven became angry and frustrated, and stuck a torn in Seagull’s foot. Raven pushed the thorn in deeper until the pain caused Seagull to the box. Then out of the box came the sun, moon and stars that brought light to the world and allowed the first day to begin.

Bill Reid created the sculpture of the Raven and the First Men depicting a scene from a Haida myth that unifies the Raven as both the trickster and the creator. Raven freed some creatures trapped in a clam. These scared and timid beings were the first men of the world, and they were coaxed out of the clam shell by the raven. Soon Raven was bored with these creatures and decided to search for the female counterparts of these male beings. Raven found some female humans trapped in a chiton, freed them and was entertained as the two sexes met and began to interact. Raven, always known as a trickster, was responsible for the pairing of humans and felt very protective of them.

Another raven story from the Puget Sound region describes the “Raven” as having originally lived in the land of spirits that existed before the world of humans. One day Raven became so bored that he flew away from the land of spirits, carrying a stone in his beak. When Raven became tired of carrying the stone and ped it, the stone fell into the ocean and expanded until it formed the firmament on which humans now live.

Corvus corax, also known as the northern raven, is a large all-black passerine bird found across the Northern Hemisphere, it is the most widely distributed of all corvids. Common ravens can live up to 21 years in the wild. Young birds may travel in flocks but later mate for life, with each mated pair defending a territory.

Ravens have coexisted with humans for thousands of years and in some areas have been so numerous that people have regarded them as pests. Part of their success as a species is due to their omnivorous diet they are extremely versatile and opportunistic in finding sources of nutrition. Some notable feats of problem-solving provide evidence that the raven is unusually intelligent. Common ravens have a wide range of vocalizations, 15 to 30 categories of vocalization have been recorded for this species, most of which are used for social interaction. The brains of ravens count among the largest of any bird species. They display ability in problem-solving, as well as other cognitive processes such as imitation and insight. Ravens are ‘inventors’, implying that they can solve problems and can learn from each other reflect a flexible capacity for intelligent insight unusual among non-human animals. They are also one of only a few wild animals who make their own toys. They have been observed breaking off twigs to play with socially. Juvenile ravens are among the most playful of bird species. They have been observed to slide down snowbanks, apparently purely for fun. They even engage in games with other species such as playing catch-me-if-you-can with wolves, otters and dogs.

Common ravens usually travel in mated pairs, although young birds may form flocks. Relationships between common ravens are often quarrelsome, yet they demonstrate considerable devotion to their families.

Ravens are year round residents in Canada and would represent Canada well as a National Bird. Their characteristics represent Canada very well, their ability to be extremely versatile at problem-solving provide evidence of intelligence and their communicative skills most of which are used for social interaction.

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To me, the common raven, Corvus corax, symbolizes many different things about Canada, from it's vast wilderness, to it's culture, and it's resourcefulness.

My whole life has been spent with a great appreciation of the outdoors, spending my summers in Northern Ontario camping, participating in wildlife and ecological research, and exploring. And throughout this the call of the raven has always been there, been present.

Ravens have long been symbols of the gods nature in Canada, largely depicted in aboriginal traditions of ill fate and death, but regarded with much respect. This depiction varied by region across the country, ranging from a mischievous trickster, to a guardian spirit, but in all cases the respect remained the same, as the raven is a powerful creature largely featured in creation lore and one connecting the human world to nature.

The resourcefulness of the raven is shown through its perserverance. Even with the modern world growing and developments encroaching on once pristine land and habitat, the raven adapts. Considered one of the most intelligent bird species, they are capable of relatively advanced problem solving, calling wolves for assistance in opening carcasses for eating, collecting objects to use later, and even using this resourcefulness in play, sliding down snowbanks on self-procured "sleds". While ravens do prefer undisturbed habitat, this does not mean that they are incapable of living in rural and human-occupied areas.

It is for these reasons that I believe the Common Raven, Corvus corax, is the ideal national bird of Canada, as it represents this country's past, present and future, through it's historic use in folklore, it's symbol of northern spirit, and it's ingenuity and resourcefulness.

I hope that this finds everyone well, and even if this proposition does not result in the raven's acceptance as a national bird, at the very least it will increase the views of this magnificent creature to what it is, a stunning being that has been a part of this country since before our ancestors settled here.

Corey Arsenault

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The National Bird Project

It should be the raven (Corvus corax) by the country mile — nolo contendere. All of the highest vote getters — loon, snowy owl and Canada goose are migrants. The raven is with us all year.

The raven is a clever tool user with 30 or more vocalizations. Captive ravens learn to speak clearly, one of which impressed Vladimir Putin at the Tower of London by greeting all of his Russian entourage with a sharp “Good morning.” During World War II, when all but one of the ravens at the Tower of London were killed, Winston Churchill issued an urgent request to West Wales to supply a few new raven pairs. Legend has it that no ravens on the Tower and Britain would fall to its enemies. Ravens with clipped wings are now major tourist attractions at the Tower, from captive bred pairs.

Our First Nations in Canada revere the raven for its playful, creative, cunning ways and have many totems to this bird for energy and magic. When Noah’s ark survived the flood the first bird released was the raven, who is mentioned some 12 times in the Bible.

Ravens can live from 15 to 40 years and generally mate for life. In cities like Edmonton, ravens regularly hold annual conferences, where hundreds of birds gather from many miles around and sit for most of the day on one or more large trees, often at 20 below or more.

The Irish and Welsh revere the raven. For example, a Welsh raven god was Bran the Blessed. The largest theatre hall in Wales at Swansea is called the Bran Gwyn (White raven). A poem learned as a child about ravens was one for sorrow, two for joy, three for a girl and four for a boy. The raven is undoubtedly the Border Collie of the Canadian bird world, should unquestionably be our national bird, exuding longevity, intelligence and endurance.

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Oh, to be a bright-sky Raven,
Darker than the night can be,
and to speak to snowy landscapes
In tones supervisory.

Grawk-guk-garruluc, grak-guk-garruluc,
goak, goak, go-ak, growk goak gogee,
Gaaaaruk, guk, graaaruk, guk gaaaaruk, guk garruluk,
Gluck, gluck, garruck, gluuk gluk, goeeee.

It's smarter than a lot of humans I know. Need I say more?

Smart and beautiful

Smart, social, and industrious. Just like Canadians 😊

Ravens are birds of great significance to Canada and especially to Canada's First Peoples.

Smart resourceful spiritual rugged survivor.

My first three choices were the Loon, the Osprey and the Raven.

The Loon has already be honoured on our Dollar coin. Going further will not add to that recognition, so I find that choice too "safe".

The Osprey is a very important bird on our Pacific coast. However, It does not occur naturally across the nation. Beside that, it's solohouette is not distinctive enough.

The Raven occurs nationwide. But, what is distinctive about it is its reverence in first nation Canadians' culture. Honouring it as our national bird would be inclusive of our aboriginal nations and honour our past by recognizing that we are but newcomers to Canada, even those of us that point back to an English or French heritage.

The Raven allows us to declare our love of country . . .

From sea . . . to sea . . . to sea . . . ; from time immemorial to forever.

This bird is all over Canada and such a curious and entertaining creature it is. On the woods it collaborates with wolves and coyotes to eat carcasses, it chatters to us with a mix of sounds and syntax, and it is one of the Tricksters. We should all have a trickster figure in our lives. Importantly, raven liberated the sun and moon from boxes where they were kept, bringing us the cycle of day with beautiful night skies.

This bird is all over Canada and such a curious and entertaining creature it is. On the woods it collaborates with wolves and coyotes to eat carcasses, it chatters to us with a mix of sounds and syntax, and it is one of the Tricksters. We should all have a trickster figure in our lives. Importantly, raven liberated the sun and moon from boxes where they were kept, bringing us the cycle of day with beautiful night skies.

This bird is all over Canada and such a curious and entertaining creature it is. On the woods it collaborates with wolves and coyotes to eat carcasses, it chatters to us with a mix of sounds and syntax, and it is one of the Tricksters. We should all have a trickster figure in our lives. Importantly, raven liberated the sun and moon from boxes where they were kept, bringing us the cycle of day with beautiful night skies.

Ranging across northern North America, including all Canadian provinces and territories, this highly intelligent bird has always been identified with the north, starting with the ancient First Nations legends of the Raven as one of the central spirits of the northlands. The wide range of calls the Raven makes means its distinctive voice is heard in a variety of ways across snowy and rocky landscapes all across this land.

Ravens are the smartest bird of north america and are a majestic choice for our country!

The raven is found from coast to coast. It is intelligent, curious, and funny. It features in our Native stories and has ties to all parts of Canada.

Common Raven is found in every Province and territory of Canad and is especially noted in First Nations and Inuit Culture

Actually I would vote for the Northern Raven, but the common one will have to do.

I lived in Whitehorse for over 20 years. Every winter, after I made chicken stock, I would take the soft bits left over after straining the stock and throw them on our garage roof for the ravens. It would take about five minutes and the first raven would appear. The raven would sit on the roof, watching over the chicken pieces, and keep an eye on any magpies that would show up. The raven would not touch the chicken, and threaten any magpie that would take a large piece of chicken, but would tolerate them taking small pieces. A few minutes later, a second raven would appear. This one would sit beside the first one for about a minute and then it would fly off. The first raven would continue guarding the food. Soon a flock of about a dozen to fifteen ravens would show up. They would land on the roof, and look at the chicken for a very short time. The oldest raven would take a piece, and then the others would join in. Only after all the ravens had taken something would the first raven take a piece.

The first time I saw this, I thought it was a fluke, but I saw it dozens of times. The first raven would not eat until the others did.

Ravens are very intelligent, they are very social, they thrive in a very harsh climate, they look after each other, and they have a sense of fun. That is why the raven should be our national bird.

The raven is a highly intelligent, creative and social bird. They have amazing vocal qualities, almost comical and then other times haunting as you hear their powerful wings swoop through a rainforest. They are the trickster and shape shifter from aboriginal stories, and in some stories they are the creator of life, bringer of light. They mediate the natural world of Canada and the spirit world of indigenous peoples who made this land their home eons before any explorers came to visit. They have a unique character that seems to communicate with humans. I worked as an actor in a traveling outdoor play, going all over the Yukon Territory. I played a raven, enacting several indigenous tales of the north. I learned a few raven calls and when doing the show, ravens would often perch and watch, or sometimes walk across the stage, and would communicate back in their language. Ravens to me are a symbol of wide open wild spaces all over Canada, convey freedom and power and the resilience of the spirit of the people who have faced hardships here (in the environment and socially & culturally). Even living in busy area of central Vancouver, I hear them calling and flying nearby. This makes me feel at one with the great spirit and all peoples when I hear them or see them...in any part of canada that I have travelled to. Its hard to choose one bird that represents Canada, but I nominate the raven for these associations and meanings I've described. Thank you!

The raven is the trickster, but has importance in mythologies all over the world, so it is both an indigenous and world-wide symbol.

The most intelligent of all birds! Resourceful, playful and hardy. It is social, gregarious and yet, the Raven is confident on its own. It is distributed throughout all Canadian provinces and territories throughout the year. It is incredibly hardy and survives Canada's severe winters. All of its attributes reflect the Canadian spirit. Just to hear the resonating call of the Raven is enough to connect us to the land!

Wouldn't it be great if we chose a bird that has been central to the culture of Canada's first peoples and remains a somewhat elusive, mystical character in so many parts of this country. The raven has unparalleled intelligence and cuts a formidable presence. The raven would be the cool choice.

The Raven suits Canada because it has fun loving attitude, it is frightfully smart. It has many friends and a lovely language.

Wouldn't it be great if we chose a bird that has been central to the culture of Canada's first peoples and remains a somewhat elusive, mystical character in so many parts of this country. The raven has unparalleled intelligence and cuts a formidable presence. The raven would be the cool choice.

The Raven is a common bird across Canada, as the name suggests. It is not limited to just certain geographical areas. It has special significance in the aboriginal community.

First off why did someone call it the common Raven? Implying it is not special or unique. the Raven is in our native stories, it brought the sun to us. the sun is most important, therefore the Raven is to be applauded for his ability to bring the sun , to us.
The Raven is the most intelligent bird, it can mimic, it can think to get it's food, it can trick, and it is found coast to coast. It can soar.
the Raven is anything but common.

First off why did someone call it the common Raven? Implying it is not special or unique. the Raven is in our native stories, it brought the sun to us. the sun is most important, therefore the Raven is to be applauded for his ability to bring the sun , to us.
The Raven is the most intelligent bird, it can mimic, it can think to get it's food, it can trick, and it is found coast to coast. It can soar.
the Raven is anything but common.

Traditionally the bringer of man to earth according to native legend.
AN INTELLIGENT BIRD THAT MATES FOR LIFE AND KEEPS ITS TERRITORY INTACT.
I have several generations living around my acreage, they are semi tame and keep pesky crows away. I admire their smart ways and the graceful way they conduct themselves.
Chicken bones, etc.. which I do not compost, are tossed into my back 40 and they are gone in no time...sometimes they sit in huge firs and wait for my appearance.
If I don't have anything, they signal their presence by buzzing my upstairs office window. They are not noisy and I can watch them soar for miles across the harbour below with little effort. My vote for sure.

they are so beautiful and clever

Raven: Corvid, smart, curious, hardy, acrobatic flyer, resourceful, mystic, mythic legend, ally, friend, wonderful repetoire of vocalizations/communications. Found in all of Canada, sea to sea to sea. They can ride the thermals in summer and glide from deep ravines/valleys to high peaks/mountains. I've had wonderful encounters with this marvelous bird in a variety of places throughout Canada. One special moment is spying one performing a loop de loop over a ski hill I was teaching/coaching at a local ski hill one winter.

It is one of the very few birds that could be seen coast to coast, from north to south, and it is one of the most intelligent one, so this by itself should be enough to make it the final choice

Ravens are the kings and queens of corvidae. Let's vote for a bird that has beauty, intelligence and loves to live near humans...

The call of the raven is a haunting, sometimes taunting, sound. It travels and resonates through the trees, mountains, and fields of our great and diverse land. It took intelligent, tough, versatile, people to make this land their home. The raven has those traits and therein lies the reason why he/she is revered by the First Nations of this country. There are those that are more colourful or sing more sweetly but the raven soars with the raptors yet sits in the branches and plays a part in the life of the low-lying areas, too. There is majesty in those inquisitive and clever eyes. There is beauty in the gloss of the blue/black feathers that adorn him. He is the king of his domain yet his humour and playfulness make him a child full of hope and joy.

Highly intelligent, characterful bird with an impressive vocabulary and socially progressive attitudes.

Ravens inspire writers and story tellers in both aboriginal and non-aboriginal cultures in ways that no other bird does. And are therefore a tremendous force for understanding and unity.

It's close to my favourite bird, the Crow.

Ravens are intelligent, very community oriented, and they figure prominently in First Nations' culture.

Making the Raven the National Bird will be a binding factor between those of us who joined the First Nation people living in this glorious land, long after they saved this land as the first environmentalists. The Raven will be the beacon of hope that we will return to everything green. Remember the Raven made this land.

No matter where you go in Canada there are crows haha

For me this is the quintessential northern bird - especially beloved by First Nations people who often regard the raven as the trickster of myth. It is also an intelligent bird. And finally, although there is the American poet, Edgar Allan Poe's wonderful poem The Raven.

I would chose the Raven as it is ubiquitous in Canada - resides here in all seasons, is extremely intelligent and resourceful and is very much a part of aboriginal culture in our country.

raven is a messenger from spirit to humans
raven is one of the most intelligent birds
raven communicates within the species
raven and his cousin crow are throughout Canada
raven as Canadians 'gathers-communicates-adapts-survives-enjoys'
raven might be overlooked within the landscape as Canadians might be overlooked in world affairs...but as the raven...we as Canadians are present to make the world a better place.

Our national bird should portray intelligence. Its been my experience they communicate between each other and can work as a team or individually to solve problems. Real Canadians spend the winter in Canada.

Both for it's beauty and it's connection to the Indigenous peoples of this nation I think the raven makes an appropriate national bird for Canada.

Partly because the raven plays such a role in First Nations stories and cultures that it should also be considered one of top choices.

Ravens are intelligent birds that feature prominently in a number of our First Nation's cultural histories. They're resourceful, adaptive, and curious. Their range covers more of Canada than the loon, and they're certainly far more interesting.

The Common Raven is not a Canada-restricted species, but what Canadian is? Intelligent, resourceful, talented, opportunistic, mysterious & fun...Raven says most about this country.

Hello, So many wonderful birds in our great country! I wish that I could vote for more than just one, because I would also choose the Loon, Canada Goose, Gray Jay, love them as well. But, you must admire our smart, beautiful and talented Raven. They are truly Canada Wide (although I haven't been North), and a part of our heritage from the beginning of our great country. Thank you.

Ravens are smart enough to demonstrate a sense of humour, a large vocabulary and ability to develop relationships with humans and other animals! Their symbolic role is huge in the understanding of First Nations. They are the cultures of They pass that knowledge along through many stories, often including the raven.

Because it can produce a few notes, though they are very flat; and it is nevar put with the wrong end in front!

This lovely, intelligent bird is ubiquitous to EVERY region of Canada and is the only bird I have seen everywhere I have gone in our country.

We are a family of birdwatchers and although we have had a difficult time in choosing, we think the Raven could be a good choice. It covers the country including the north and I think the First Nations peoples would also agree to the majestic Raven as our symbol.

Crows/Ravens are intelligent, resourceful and curious. I enjoy watching their behaviour.

The common raven is a year-round resident. It is a resilient, intelligent bird, and while her call isn't as sweet as that of southern-wintering loon it is no less distinctive.

The raven is a revered, sacred bird and plays a starring role in many, if not all, of Canada's founding cultures.

Ravens are social creatures, they work together and learn from one another. I would take a constable of ravens any day over any solitary eagle.

When I think of the north country, I think of the cold north wind, I think of Raven in her element!

I love the raven and crows - magical,mystical and intelligent

They care for their family and each other. Ever watch the gathering when one of them dies? They care for one another. We feed them and in return they watch over us, warning with calls when strange animals and people approach. Our cat as well as ourselves have become part of their family. Is that not the Canadian way "to watch out for and help each other"? This intelligent, resourceful, social bird is definitely a symbol of Canada.

The raven is a curious, wondrous, beautiful bird with great size. With great histories amid Canada's First Nations peoples, the raven had mystified generations with its behaviours and antics. Portraying intelligence, the raven often emulated human behaviour and sound.
The raven can be seen anywhere from the far northern things to the south.
Raven is reflected in many First Nations legends, songs, and dances. Raven is linked to First Man stories. Raven stories can be related to anyone and brings linkages through common knowledge.
Bringing the raven forward as the Canadian bird is fulfilling a destiny that has been waiting to be fulfilled.

I grown up in the Arctic and all year round, Ravens are always stay and lay their eggs during winter. And their calls are memorizing, there is even some legendary Inuit stories about them.

I grown up in the Arctic and all year round, Ravens are always stay and lay their eggs during winter. And their calls are memorizing, there is even some legendary Inuit stories about them.

The Raven is honored by most native cultures. It's habitat is across the country and it is considered to be one of the most intelligent birds in the country.

Ravens have a huge vocabulary and are very intelligent.

R.I.P Harambe You will be missed

it is close to a crow

it is close to a crow

It has all been said. Its population covers most of Canada. It has been been part of our culture before Canada was a nation or colony. http://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/raven/

The more north you go the bigger they are.
They stay here in winter.
They are intelligent , and have send of humor.

they are crafty, smart, and beautiful.

This intelligent humorous bird may not be the prettiest but all Canadians have seen or heard a raven.
I have spent many hours watching them entertaining themselves in every province in this huge country. All Canadians can say yes ...I have seen a raven.

1. Ravens look bad-ass
2. Ravens are rather smart feathered critters
3. Ravens can imitate vocalisations of some Senate members
4. A Raven once knocked over my beer and stole my girlfriend
5. Both Rick Mercer and Ron James have a Raven on their writing staff
6. Faced with a long hard winter, Ravens will drink beer and watch hockey
7. Ravens are collectors of the eclectic - one my my neighborhood has in its nest, a prosthetic eye from who-knows-where
8. If selected to be Canada's National Bird, it would execute the duties of office efficiently and blame any short-comings on the previous bird.

While the Canadian provinces have quite a few birds in winter, in Nunavut, the raven is pretty much the only one around in the urban areas. Walking to work each morning, I would hear them talking to each other, and I would talk back to them. It felt as if they were trying to teach me to speak "raven."

These birds are clever, finding ways to get into places they shouldn't get into, like garbage bins. They also work together, with one or two distracting dogs while the others steal their food.

While many Canadian birds may be more beautiful or have a prettier song, I'm voting for the raven to represent the Canadian population. They may be humble, but they're resourceful and smart.

Canada has so many beautiful birds that any of them would serve well as Canada's bird. The raven is understated but magnificent, organised and very intelligent, and generally does not bother other birds. Their geographic range is large andthese birds work together to achieve goals.
They are perfect for Canada's bird.

The Raven is a very intelligent bird found in most regions of Canada. It is revered in native custom and the focus of artists, poets and writers. Not as flashy as some of the other choices, but the Raven has been a companion to humans for centuries.

Simply put the Raven is, for me, a surrogate for the related common crow. Common by name - I have seen this bird from coast to coast - and common as a visitor to my backyard. Anyone who takes even a few moments to watch this bird will know, however, how uncommonly intelligent and resourceful this bird can be. Crows demonstrate elements of conscious decision making, and many times I have watched as they carefully select and measure before leaving with their bounty. Watching a coordinated effort to repel a hawk is to observe teamwork in action. Some people hate crows (and ravens)and cite traits that are, quite frankly, human. It puzzles me that people don't realize the irony. Our crows often wait outside for us and chatter. I'm rewarding them with my vote.

Smartest bird! My father rescued an injured Raven many years ago in Northern Ontario. Cheers!

The raven is the most important mythic bird in Canada's history, it survives in the most harsh of climates. They do not migrate south unlike other birds that have more votes that are merely summer birds.

I see them at the cottage and their mournful croaking as they fly across the lake on a misty morning is a very evocative scene, typify ingredients my love for the region.

Ravens are by far the smartest of the birds listed. Unfortunately they often have negative images associated with them such as death. They deserve a positive light being shone on them.

Smartest bird out there. Period!

One of the smartest and beautiful birds in the world. Part of First Nations culture more importantly.

I think Canada should adopt the Common raven as its national bird. Majestic, wild and highly adaptable, the raven is one of the few Canadian birds that can be seen from the East to West to the Great White North, and is found in almost all the diverse habitats of this expansive country. With its eerie, resonant call spanning across valleys and mountains,many Canadians have been in the presence of this national beauty. Simple yet mesmerizing with its slick, black plumage, the raven is a social bird and highly adaptable to humans and their busy lives - yet is most at home in the quiet wilderness. More than probably any other bird, the raven holds a special place in many of Canada's Aboriginal cultures and is held in high regard and with much respect. This reason alone is a convincing argument why Canadians should adopt the raven as its national bird. Finally, the raven is curious, intelligent and very social - all while attracting quiet respect from other inhabitants. Much like Canadians.

Having traveled in six provinces and 2 territories, I'd have to say that the raven is the only bird that I have seen that is common to all.

The sight and sound of a raven is so iconic. They evoke a special sense of place.

Though it doesn't sound like a particularly "Canadian" bird, the Raven is one of the birds which can be found in all provinces and territories, unlike many of the birds up for vote. From remote communities in the North to the Great Lakes, from coast to coast, you can find these hardy, robust birds surviving. Like Canada and its people, Ravens are tough to the cold, very smart, and rather savvy.

I think that the sound they make that echoes around the mountains in particular is hauntingly beautiful and unforgettable - bit like Canada really.

I believe a bird that represents Canada should be found throughout as much of Canada as possible. The Raven is such a bird and while it is found on other continents we can appreciate that this bird stays in its habitat year round. Its distinctive call is known throughout Canada and it is an intelligent bird working together to gather food. It is a bird of great importance to First Nations peoples.

Oiseau très intelligent. Oiseau très respecté des Autochtones.

Found throughout the Country this bird knows the country well and should be our national bird

I vote the Raven for Canada's national bird. Ravens are highly intelligent birds and they really are beautiful too. They are so much a part of Canada's landscape and feature in many indigenous myths and legends. The Raven ranges across the entire country, they are majestic, wonderful birds. Please consider the Raven for Canada's national bird. Thank you.

Intelligent, handsome, and ubiquitous throughout Canada.

The Common Raven has held a very important place in the history of our country beginning with our First Nations. Like Canadian people they are intelligent, adaptable and successfully lives throughout the country from the artic to southern Ontario, and from the west to east coast.

Gorgeous,,,,graceful flyers,,,,,mesmerizing,,,,,super intelligent,,,,,,guardians,,,,,,spirited birds!!

One of the smartest birds in the world - more intelligent than most mammals. Studies are proving remarkable capabilities for members of the raven/crow family - corvids. Wonderful tool users, clever problem solvers and very adaptable to environments. Like humans they are omnivores, opportunistic and both hunters and gathers. They live throughout Canada and are a part of our heritage as they are part of the cultural heritage of many of Canada's founding ethnicities including First Nations, Scandinavian and other Europeans. Large birds, unafraid of other birds or humans. Solid jet black but shine iridescent blue and purple in sunlight.

In the raven, I see several qualities that Canadians are reputed to possess, and worth aspiring to.

Humility, in so far as this is a bird beautiful in its sleekness, function, and subtlety, not in bold plumage or song.

Intelligence, for just as Canadians need to uphold a reputation as level-headed world leaders, relative to more powerful nations, the raven is clever and tactful, even if one recently tampered with evidence at a Vancouver crime scene. No joke.

Playfulness. Is the kind reputation of Canadians deserved? I would choose to believe it is exaggerated, if only to take that as an impetus and opportunity to improve in that regard. Ravens are tricksters and gamesters, and there is something in that playful, joyous spirit worth emulating and cultivating in ourselves.

And all of this without speaking on the role of the raven in native Canadian folklore, nor it's ecological role. Here's hoping the raven ascends to symbolic status in Canada, and let it descend Nevermore.

The choice should be about more than what bird is mostly unique to Canada. The meaning behind that choice is far more important. Loons and Canadian Geese are lovely looking creatures but are kind of dicks.

The Raven holds a significant place in the mythology of this Nation's first residents and for good reason. This intelligent creature represents an extension of ourselves and while it may take on many forms and many roles has the common theme of being the hero.

What can be more Canadian than that?

One of the smartest birds. Seems fitting.

This bird crafty AF. It that smart house at Hogwarts!

Everyone respects ravens! Resilient geniuses. I'd take that over being pretty and fragile any day.

I have grown up watching ravens and they are beautiful, majestic birds. Where I live now there are several that must nest nearby - I see them perched in trees eating prey and they regularly fly past.

Ravens are one of the most interesting birds that inhabit my back yard. Contrary to being nasty fellows they seem to fit right in with many birds we watch in my back yard. Of course there is a pecking order and they are top of the list

Ravens have lived with humans for many years, they are very intelligent as well as opportunistic. Because Ravens are extremely versatile birds, they are able to easily co exist with Humanity & have adapted well to our civilizations.

The Raven has played a role in both Pagan & Religious folklore for centuries & in many diverse cultures Ravens have been depicted as spiritual creatures. With Canada priding itself on Multiculturalism & with it's growing recognition of First Nations it seems fitting that the Raven shall be the bird of choice for all of Canada.

Alayah Vandersleen

I am voting for the raven because of its significance in First Nations culture.

Year round to our area!

Because my girlfriend loves ravens.

The raven is truly "national" in its distribution. I live with them on the northern stretch of the Niagara Escarpment. It is non-aggressive with other birds, and is a magnificent soarer. It is also tied to Native tribes in their mythology.

The Common Raven has the most verbalized expressions of any animal, likely in the whole world. Their intelligence as a bird is exceptional as proven in many scientific experiments. Their flying ability is second to none. When the Chinook Winds come howling in in winter time, you can rest a sure the Ravens are playing in the updrafts of clay-cliffs. One stipulation for any of Canada's National Bird, must be, they must stay in Canada though-out our winter season and not migrate. The only migrating the Raven does is leave town when the Seagulls arrive in the spring. Really, they are just taking a time out from their scavenger duties to raise their young.

About a year and a half ago, ravens discovered that the students of my elementary school carry snack food. It is nice to see them back in Toronto.

I LUV RAVENS

The Raven was an easy choice for me as I have long known about their smart behavior, interesting vocalizations and social characteristics. Truly the best choice to represent all of Canada.

Intelligent, amusing, and found every where.

Not an essay, just a comment: Ravens are intelligent, very hardy and stay in Canada year round. I have seen and appreciated their inventiveness in many parts of Western Canada and the Yukon. Their varied "language" is also quite interesting to listen to as well.

In my opinion, a national bird should
- be found throughout the country
- be a full-time, year-round resident
- link to our Native Peoples and culture
- be something that attracts curiosity
- be visible to everyone (don't need to be a birder to find it)
- be easy to identify
- have intrinsic beauty (not just superficial)
- be intelligent
The RAVEN meets all these criteria and then some.
Therefore the RAVEN is my choice.

When I was a teenager we had what we called our "pet" raven...Jimmy Joe...Slept in a tall big tree near our house...and the moment his sharp ears heard morning movements he began his calling for attention.
He was a tease, and could worry our dog unmercifully.
When my brothers were working on their cars they had to watch their tools, nuts, etc, or he would be off with them to hide them in gutters, or? One day he disappeared and never came back... I think my father missed him the most...I certainly vote for this extremely intelligent creature. The other, so-well written comments, say every thing!!

The Raven is a strong bird that's not flashy or particularly attention seeking but does command respect in both the animal & human worlds. The Raven is wise, uncommonly intuitive/inquisitive, with a keen eye for detail, & a very pronounced sense of humour . Ravens simultaneously have the gift of stealth, & also a commanding presence. Revered by Native Canadians for their wisdom, strength & grace, the Raven is considered by many a messenger of the spirits/spirit world/spirit guides and is part of the fabric of many of our different spiritual communities. This humble, distinctive, quiet bird is also fiercely protective of its territory & its young. For these reasons, the Raven is very representative of the collective Canadian spirit & would represent our country with dignity , grace & warmth.

A great symbol of our history, tying together the First Nations and Northern European traditions. As we welcome people to Canada from many other nations the Raven will be a symbol of welcome. The Raven welcomes the dawn, welcomes all seasons and also the night. Just as the Raven perseveres in all seasons and habitats so do we as Canadians.

As a contributor to the eBird database, I have submitted sightings of the Raven in every month of the year here in Nova Scotia, in fact the Raven is more commonly seen in the winter, the season for which we are most famous!

i vote for the birb becuz he like eat peanut

Ravens are very smart birds, too. Unassuming, they take advantage of any opportunity, but they aren't pushy. Just like Canadians. :-)

Intelligence over beauty!

The Raven is a tough, smart, self-sufficient bird who is with us all year even through the winter. And according to the Haida he opened the Clam shell and let Man out into the World.

The Raven is circumpolar so I would imagine that another country has also picked the Raven as their national bird. That would indicate that this bird is well thought of in a similar northern land. The Raven being smart, vocal and very visible, is venerated by the Aboriginal People of northern part of North America. I would assume for the same reasons, the Aboriginal People of the northern area of Asia would also hold the bird in high esteem. It would seem to me that Canada, being a large part of the Circumpolar countries, would do well to chose such a bird as the Raven which is so well thought of by so many other people in the Raven's home.

It's incredibly intelligent, vital to the eco-system, and often makes symbiotic relationships with other species. Canada.

Vote the Raven.
She has to be the most intelligent of our feathered beings.
I spend hours with them almost daily.
I've seen them make tools out of bobby pins, straws, cups and any scrap of nothingness they can find. They can extract the smallest bits of food from the most complicated places with their tools.
They have their own language and speak to each other from great distances. They also tell their friends and kin about those who are kind to them.
They remember you. They return to talk to you. They are truly fascinating and humankind can learn so much from their own culture and how they rely and defend each other.
Ask a First Nations person about The Raven. You will be amazed.
My heart is smiling to think that one day this most majestic, loving, communal feathered critter will be recognized and honoured as our National Bird.
Please vote The Raven.

Man I don't know how to follow any of these other great reasons/essays, they have far better arguments then I could have made.
I just wanted to share my Raven story, so here it is.
I used to work at this place that was almost directly below a bridge and next to a wastewater treatment plant that doubled as some sort of wildlife nature reserve, (No idea how that works and although there are many many info panels in the area I never paid them much attention) anyways there were always like thousands of rabbits running around the fields and paths as well as roads (yes it was a common roadkill), and we were often blessed with birds of prey of all sorts on the hunt such as hawks, eagles, and owls.
For a good couple years an eagle made perch in the rafters of the bridge and chased off almost all the other birds off except a few owls.
One nice sunny Sunday afternoon a Raven appeared in the sky apparently searching for a new home and found our great paradise of rabbits, so he flew around in the sky for a while and then found himself a nice perch in the rafters of the bridge but slightly higher and more centred over the eagles nest. The eagle obviously had a problem with this and seemed to often want a fight but also seemed intimidated by the Raven, but Raven always just played it cool, then one day at about 8am the loudest pop I ever heard followed by a power outage was the end of the bird feud as for whatever reason the eagle had decided to land on exposed wiring 3 ft. from the transformer and electrocuted itself and hung stuck to the line until someone came to clear it off. Some hours later the raven casually pushed the eagles home out of the rafters. Maybe I give the bird too much credit for this but I swear the Raven murdered the Eagle and made it out like an accident.

GO KARASUNO!!!!!

karasunoooo,,,, FIGHT!

battle at the garbage dump yay

I think it is the only bird that hangs around way up north for the Christmas bird count.
Also - awesome character in First Nation stories.

The Raven lives all across Canada and is highly intelligence. They are the Native Canadians bird of choice is so many of their myths, especially the creation myth about how Canada came to be.Bill Reid's gorgeous sculpture at the Museum of Man in Hull Quebec tells this story very well.

One of the most intelligent birds ,the colours within this bird amaze me, I have conversations with ravens in their language,i can get them to stop and talk to me ,I'm not sure what I'm saying but i think I've made a few mates.

Fantastic bird - clever, tough, sense of humor, a bird that will stay in the frozen north the whole year round & can be taught to talk like a parrot.

The Raven is a sacred bird to our indigenous population.
It can be seen much more often than the loon which is already well represented on the one dollar coin. That is why people are probably voting for it so often.

Ravens are super intelligent and are more likely to interact with humans.

Too bad Hitchcock gave the bird such a bad wrap!!!

The Raven is found in every province. No province has selected the Raven as a provincial bird, like the loon in Ontario. It is called the trickster by first nations people on the west coast.
it is important to first nations culture.
it is important to ecology and wolves.
it is likely our most intelligent bird.
it is now nesting in Southern Ontario in Hamilton and the Niagara Peninsula. it is expanding its range.

It is my understanding that the Raven exists in all provinces and territories. Therefore it is well qualified to represent Canada. Also , good or bad, it is well known by all residents of this country.
The birds attention to expanding its population and caring for its young well into adulthood is exemplary for us all.

Any corvid would be a perfect national bird. Smart, well-known and abundant, the raven would be a logical choice. The only bird better would be the american crow, my favorite bird

A ubiquitous northern bird. Intelligent, creative, courageous; the Raven perfectly symbolizes the unassuming strength of the Canadian soul. Most importantly though, the Raven is a powerful symbol of Canada's first nations, figuring prominently in native stories and myths from coast to coast to coast. Where the owl lurks, the goose waddles, and the loon cries, the raven soars above spruce forests, mountain vales, and rocky coasts, and reminds us all what it means to be northern.

they are amazing and great birds.

Ravens are the most intelligent birds, live in families and have strong community bonds. The Raven brought light to the people according to some Aboriginal cultures and I feel like the Raven as a symbol includes ALL Canadians. Ravens are found on every continent in the world so they are familiar to everyone, even new Canadians.

Ravens are the smartest birds in Canada and are very majestic.

The Common Raven is a survivor,an adapter and adjuster...an example of what we all should be as life and time changes.

We have always loved the raven!

Recognizable across the country as a northern bird. Native. Strong roots in Aborigjnal culture.

The Raven.
Is there ever a more majestic looking bird?
Shrouded in myth and lore! The Trickster, The Scavenger, knocking at your door with the words...Nevermore!
He's been associated with witches and found along side Halloween Decorations,
But what else does Raven stand for?
He is the Bringer of Light by casting light into the darkness, the guardian AGAINST negative and
evil energies, Warrior, Healer!
He also likes to pull feathers of other birds from time to time!
Canadian soldiers brought the light and cast light into the darkness to Holland in WW2. We stood our ground as Warriors in the war of 1812 against the invading United States. We helped Heal slaves by helping them through the Underground Railroad. And today, many countries look to us to help cast light into Darkness. Everything that the Raven symbolizes!
So what better bird to dipict Canada and her people!
Not witchcraft, not tricksters, not scavengers.
But intelligent beings who know when to stand as Warriors or to cast light into the darkness and to heal.
The Raven has also been known to pull the feathers of a certain Bald Eagle! Now that's my kind of bird!

Among many other reasons (including strength, beauty and intelligence), it would be great to honour our native people through having the raven as our national bird.

The raven has great significance to our First Nations. It is also a year-round resident of every province and territory - a truly all-Canadian bird.

The Raven is an important part of indigenous lore is intelligent, communicates at times with humans and when necessary can memeorize faces and events.

The Raven or Crow
Which way do you go
They clean up all our streets
Eating all the meats
They like to play in groups
Circling in hoops
There playground is Canada wide
Cause there's so many places hide
They'll sing you off to work
So pray for them
Like they prey for you!

RAVENS are smart long lived and have a huge variety of vocalizations, and they adapt to their environment and learn new sounds. They are social and family oriented. They have a long tradition in first nations mythology for being clever. They even have a sense of humour.

The raven is not only present throughout the country, they are incredibly intelligent birds. Their appearance is classically simple. Plus, and I think this is important, they play a significant role in the traditions of many indigenous nations in this land. It would be ideal, I think, to consult with First Nations people and get their opinions on this matter. There may be a bird species even more appropriate, or it may be viewed as inappropriate to choose a sacred bird for the national bird.

Actually I would have chosen crows but they were not an option

I chose the Raven as it is a bird common to all parts of Canada. The raven has been described as brilliant and mostly is known as a trickster. My other reason for choosing the raven is that it figures big in the First Nations peoples stories and in being one of their clans.I enjoy watching the antics of ravens as they tease the neighbours dog and as they perform sky ballet and play tag with each other. A thoroughly enjoyable bird.

Anyone who has watched the antics of this bird, both on the ground, and in flight would understand my choice.
Standing stock still on a stump near a beaver meadow, the Ravens performed for me. Flying upside down, grasping at the feat of fellow ravens, diving at me, and pulling up just feet from my spot, all fun and games.
Listening to them 'talking' with their various calls, and the long range croooaank they often make in flight.
They are a master of the north woods, and a true Canadian bird.

A raven is part of Indigenous culture, and also bad ass it's a good choice.

abundant, exquisite flyer very much like Swallows, everywhere, smart, actually play, they clean more than they befoul (unlike the Canada goose) They don't migrate- a true resident of Canada

I like ravens and crows.
More than I like people.
They seem smarter than people.
They deserve more.

The common raven is the bird we have the closest relationship to in our neighbourhood. They are bright, inquisitive, bold and of constant interest to our toddler, who tries to speak their language.

The Raven lives everywhere, symbolic in Native art, stories, etc and they are just so smart.

The raven is found in every part of Canada throughout the year and has been highly regarded by aboriginal peoples of this land. The raven is a very smart, opportunistic animal, surveying the landscape & activities from the highest point. They live equally well with humans or in the wilderness. Ravens are confident, inquisitive birds, extremely versatile and thought to be the most intelligent of all birds. They are social or can be solitary and are loyal as they mate for life. All qualities found in Canada!

I am a big fan off Ravens and Crows. Their intelligence is impressive and I think they are a beautiful bird. Now have a family of crows coming to my backyard who eat along with the rest of my birds and wildlife.

Le grand corbeau est un oiseaux très intelligent qui s'adapte aisément à toutes les situations.

The raven is a magical bird that inhabits the landscape in a way that stirs our imagination and compels our curiosity - I'm sure more stories have been written about this bird than any other, and it helps that it's such a central character in native folklore.

L'intelligence des corbeaux ne cesse d'être étudié et ne cesse d'épater les chercheurs. Ces oiseaux sont tant habiles à s'adapter à l'hiver qu'à l'été, aux milieux ruraux ou urbains, et tout le monde reconnait leur appel.

C'est l'un des oiseaux les plus vus et reconnus après le pigeon (oublions le pigeon comme choix aussi). Il y a un certain charme a cette oiseau malgré les symboles qu'il y sont liés.

The Common Raven has wide distribution across Canada and has significance among First Nations cultures.

Ravens are fascinating, highly intelligent animals, and they have a strong connection to the Native lore from all across the country. I think they would make a great symbol for the country.

Fits with our historical and traditional histories.

I'm personally rooting for the raven cause it geographically covers most of Canada and has deep ties with many Native legends.

The raven is highly intelligent and misunderstood. It is a common sight where I grew up in Ontario.

The raven ! because:
-of it's part in First Nations legends
is very evocative of the northern part of North Amerca,
distinctive bold and beautiful presence
unique and fun vocalizations

The Raven is intelligent and resourceful and is very much a Northern bird which is native to all parts of our country. It doesn't flee south to escape our winters and it's coal black colour stands out in beautiful contrast to both the snow and the mossy evergreen forests that are its home. The northern woods echo with its wild, defiant and singular call. The raven is a symbolic image of creation in many aboriginal cultures and a figure of importance in many legends and folk tales of our country. I hate to be negative but the Loon already is spoken for (Ontario) and it migrates south for the winter....poor choice. The chickadee is cute but lacks the required majesty and gravitas. The Great Grey Owl is too regional and seldom seen. The Raven and the Beaver, what could be more Canadian; neither would even be considered any where else.

Ravens are smart and found all over Canada: coast to coast to coast.

The Common is a great bird. It’s the largest songbird in the north.
Most birds only stay in Canada for the summer but the Raven stays year round everywhere in Canada.
Also the Raven is the smartest bird and the most mischievous in Canada.The Raven is a Yukon Territory bird but it would be a great bird for Canada.
Lot’s of people think the Raven is all black but the neck feathers are gray.The Raven is an annoying bird because their calls are loud. The sound is like r rock r rock calk - calk. The female utters a knocking call like the woodpecker. I think the Raven would be a great bird for Canada. VOTE FOR THE RAVEN!

the common raven is the bird that signalled viking sailors they were near land. It was a common sight for me growing up, not only are they beautiful, elegant, mischievous, and bold, they evoke a powerful feeling of strength. often under rated and overlooked, or seen as a "death"bird. It is the bird of the childhood of many canadians, and is unassuming, yet up close, it is a powerful bird.

I believe we should call the raven our national bird for many reason. The first reason being that Canadians can Iconise this bird for its smarts, adaptability, and history in Native American stories. The raven is also found all over the world... Canadians are made up of people from all over the world. Resourceful people; seeing this land for the beauty and opportunity it is. In all aspects of metaphor for personality and it's way of living; Canadians can relate to the rave.

There are no sweet, syrupy songs in the reportoire of the raven. Isn't that how Canadians are viewed. We are the ones that bring the sound of reason to the table. Smart, underestimated and yet persistent in doing what is in our natures; unfazed by popularity contests and secure in the knowledge of who we are.

Smatrtest bird in Canada

I think the raven should win because when I first saw it it looked so pretty. When I first heard the name I loved it. Here is a poem on it:

Ravens,
Beautiful,peaceful,
Flying,Chirping,Singing,
it should be the national bird,
bird.

REMEMBER VOTE FOR THE COMMON RAVEN :-) :-) ;-)

The Raven should be our national bird because of it's Canada-wide distribution. It survives where others do not, and, unlike the smaller songbirds, it's a dignified, impressive, powerful bird.
As to it's reputation, sure, it's a killer and a scavenger. So it the Bald Eagle. A bird's got to eat.
And, on a practical note, a Raven easy to draw and color for maps, logos, etc. No tricky markings that, if gotten wrong, turn it into some other bird entirely. (Except for crows, which are both different in silhouette, and didn't even make the list.)
Ravens are scientifically acknowledged to be intelligent and clever, and even before science played roles like 'trickster' and 'messenger' in mythologies around the world.
Ravens are magic. Vote Raven.

I think the Common Raven should be Canada's National bird because of their behavior. It is funny and awesome just like all of you and Canada. I think that if you vote for the raven you won't be sorry. You will enjoy it all day!

The Raven, “The Trickster”. A bird of every province and of great intelligence, strength, longevity, and power with significant importance to the First Nations Peoples.

Again, like many things people vote in a certain way because their neighbor voted that way...The Common Loon! It's not fair! He has had free publicity since the abollition of the paper $1 bill, common' people have some imagination.
The Raven, now that's a bird, that reflects the true Canadian. The underdogs who does it their way in every province of this great land from scorching 35*C to bone chilling -55*C this bird does not bailout when the going gets tough. He does not have a boastfull name, he is Common and humble doing his best to survive while being tormented by the American Crow! There are many good traits to the Raven but one of the best I like is his desire to keep the roadsides clean and doing a fine job cleaning up after those other creatures in their rubber wheeled transportation machines......GO RAVEN!

We need a symbol that applies to all Canadians, unlike the Maple Leaf. The Raven is the only bird with all Canadians all year long.Smart,resourceful,loyal it mates for life, flies for the enjoyment of it and is fully aerobatic.
Some see it as a scavenger but to survive in our land you must be strong and resourceful. A true companion in out of the way places it always stops to say hello. It sees all,first.Unlike european cultures the first peoples revered the bird for it`s intelligence and knowledge. Their opinion is the only one applicable to our land in this regard. This bird represents the Canuck character in so many ways and is with all of us even in the high Arctic.

The Raven appears in Aboriginal folklore throughout Canada. It is intelligent. It can survive our varied harsh Canadian winters. It appears everywhere. Cities, the Bush, up North.

i love the raven i love his stories i love her strength and no bird is smarter.

- significant spiritual meaning for indigenous people including creation myth for Haida, Inuit and others
- range is close to100% of Canada
- sticks around for all seasons including winter
- highly intelligent
- a "trickster" with an apparent sense humour
- takes time to play

I believe my email address gives everyone an idea of how I revere Ravens. They are intelligent, cross-species co-operative, survivors, like crocodiles, rats and sharks...living many many many years, because of their adaptability. They are beautiful multifaceted avion companions, and, all of our environments are cleaner, healthier and safer because of their presence.

COMMON RAVEN IS THE BEST BIRD.

The Raven epitomizes the essence of the landscape in which it resides. It is a visible resident of both rural and urban landscapes with a strong vocal calling. Previous writers have captured and portrayed many of the qualities that make this animal a wise choice for Canada.

Messenger of the gods. Sacred to native people and Europeans. Present in all areas of Canada. Powerful, beautiful and mysterious.

The Common Raven is virtually everywhere in Canada, and lives here year-round. It is articulate, recognizable and playful. It represents the Canadian identity.

I like to say that I am a raven watcher. When I'm in the garden I hear them calling in the woods and I call back. Sometimes they answer.

Ever since we moved from Toronto to live near Parry Sound, Georgian Bay, we have been constantly learning about the natural world that surrounds us here and top of the list is the Raven. This is because there is a Raven pair who nest nearby and have given us countless hours of enjoyment as we watch them execute incredible aerial feats in the sky or listen to the many intriguing sounds they make and I wonder, is there a Raven dictionary because I would like to know what they are saying. I know there is one call to let the partner know when they arriving, it's like 'honey I'm home"". Last summer the pair succeeded in raising two chicks who hung about our house, walking on the roof and pecking at the sky light. They made a lot of noise too!
So why do I vote the Raven? Because when winter arrives and all the other birds have gone, they remain - no whimpy snowbirds are they! And RAvens reside from coast to coast to coast in this amazing country. They are so intelligent and resourceful, it would be an honour to have the Raven as our national bird.

In my view the Raven is the only choice.The raven uses its intelligence to better fulfill its daily needs. Just like Canadians. It is the Raven that stays in Canada year-round and flourishes in all of the four seasons. Just like a tough Canadian. It's the Reaven that's big bold and beautiful just like Canada.

A clever bird with a distinctive croak. It is a bird of native legend and myth. It is big and bold.

The raven doesn't desert us in the winter. It is a survivor, making do with what it can scavenge. It is big and bold.

The Common Raven is a spirit bird of the First Nations and I believe that our national bird should be about recognizing and celebrating the first peoples of Canada. Additionally, the Common Raven range is far reaching in Canada. Other birds being considered are not as widespread.

Tough, adaptable, creative, collaborative; they live across much of Canada; they are talkative and playful but often solitary and reserved. Intensely beautiful - a shard of black stone against the snow. A true bird of the north. I would be proud to call it Canada's national bird.

I choose the Raven as Canada's National Bird because it is the bird that lives in all of Canada and stays in Canada throughout the winter, like so many Canadians. It has a great sense of humor and is creative, adaptable and wise. It is a strong bird, not showy, and my favorite part, it can mimic the sounds of anything in its environment. I only began knowing the raven as a couple moved into our neighborhood in Edmonton. They giggled and chortled until I began to chortle and visit back to them. They sounded so much like a pair of gossips that I had to learn more. When I found out that they were great mimics, can even mimic mechanical sounds, I had to laugh, that is what Edmontonians sound like!!
So I choose the raven, they have all the attributes of strong, fun-loving, adaptable and creative Canadians who thrive in a changeable and sometimes difficult land.

The Raven is a Canada-wide bird, and it is so all year around. It is a very wise bird in a country that needs more wisdom showing from its leaders.

The other birds may be prettier and nicer, but they just don't have the intelligence and the distribution -- that is, all-year-round Canadian distribution -- that the Raven has.

Anyone who has watched the raven pull the tail feathers of a bald eagle or pick up a beaver tail to scare an eagle away from a carcass, will appreciate the symbolism of this choice. Here's for a national bird with brains!

Common raven/Grand corbeau
Un oiseau très intelligent dont les qualités exceptionnelles font de lui un symbole fort pour les Canadiens.
Présent sur tout le territoire, il survit aux plus rudes conditions climatiques et géographiques.
Vénéré par les Premiers peuples il représente le Créateur dont le sens de l'humour le rend sympathique et craint tout à la fois. Je vous encourage à voter pour le Grand corbeau à cause du courage, de la force et de l'intelligence de cet animal mythique. D'ailleurs, aucune province ni territoire ne l'a choisi comme symbole. Mon voilier se nomme le White Raven et arbore fièrement l'image totémique traditionnelle du Grand corbeau peinte par un artiste Haïda. Une image unificatrice du Pacifique à l'Atlantique à l'Arctique.

Stéphane Boisjoly
Capitaine du White Raven

I think the raven would be a great national Bird because they are very smart and are tricksters and would represent the Canadian spirit greatly

I believe the Common Raven should be Canada's national bird because of its wide distribution, its intelligence, and its significance for native people. It is important that the choice be relevant to native people because many of them are still closer to nature than most non-native people and it's time that "national" projects included native people.

Raven - trickster and transformer ... a bird that surprises.
Large in first peoples' legends.
Intelligent, strong and social.
Occurs across Canada ... the more remote, the more likely
What's not to like.

There is no Canadian bird that has a range map that includes almost all of Canada on a year-round basis. Except for the most northerly populations, it does not migrate. This is no Snowbird! It stays in Canada year round. How many Canadian bird species can claim that? It occupies all habitats in Canada. It is certainly a native bird! The Common Raven has become intertwined with many First Nation cultures and folklore in Canada as a bird that symbolizes wisdom, fertility and creation.

It's stark black colour, relatively large size and varied, guttural bird call makes it an eye-catching bird to see and a charm to hear. It is present in urban and rural areas of Canada, making it one of the most visible examples of bird species in Canada. It is often seen when no other birds are around.

Thought to be highly intelligent, like other members of the Corvid family, it is an adaptable bird capable of varied, clever, behaviours, that can endear it to local residents.

It performs a valuable ecological service with its varied diet of insects, beetles, fruits, nuts, carrion and therefore helps recycle nutrients in the environment.

This bird species is by no means at risk, meaning that Canadians are likely to encounter the bird relatively easily and appreciate its presence for generations.

Given the variety of its bird call, it gives the impression that it is bilingual if not multilingual, reflecting linguistic diversity in Canada.

No other bird species embodies so many aspects of our country and our cultures and for that reason the Common Raven deserves to be recognized as Canada's national bird.

FYI Hong Kong has more Canadians that all but the 10 largest Canadian cities. You should not restrict your form to just North American addresses.

Ravens are cool and smart. Enough said.

The Common Raven besides being important in Canadian First Nation mythology, it represents Canadians with showing no fear and stands up to protect friends and family. Opposite to human Canadians, it is NOT polite, and is very brash and noisy, but that is not a bad thing, maybe we should follow the example of the Common Raven.

The raven makes its home in all Canadian provinces and territories. It is Canadian in all respects - intelligent, resourceful and with the ability to take the coldest winters in stride. Raven doesn't take life too serious and always finds time to have some fun. And, by no means the least, Raven has an important place in first nations culture. There is no other bird, however pretty they may be, that so thoroughly represents Canadian hertiage and spirit.

Sure the Snowy Owl, the loon and Canada Goose are nice BUT they are transient and move according to weather! The Raven! a true Canadian that does not take off to fairer climates, these birds are tough, smart and seem to do what "they" want. These birds are quite the charactors as well and are mentioned widely amoung the Indian / Native People's tails and folklore as a wise trickster too amoung other traits. I am very disapointed that Canadians are not giving this bird the respect it deserves and was very, very surprised it was not in the top 5, common' people wake up! GO RAVEN!!
Thanks Len

For ten months of the year I live in Tuktoyaktuk and sometimes share that time with Aklavik in the NOrthwest Territories where I work as a community health nurse in those wonderful communities. I have watched the common Raven in all its splendor stariing into my apartment as it perched on a wire from a buildinig in a clever way to avoid 125 mile an hour windss I have heard what is for me one of the most beautiful sounds that being their spring chatter sounds which make you laugh out loud...the unique sound of a marble being dropped into a bottle of water. I have watched the Raven watch me and negotiate his interest which is usually lost very quickly as great black wings materialize and wisk the bird away like magic . The Common Raven is worthy of being nominated as Canada's National Bird.

what Jeff George said about the raven...

Found across Canada. History with indigenous peoples. Looks good, sounds great, smart.

ah le corbeau vraiment c'est le meilleur choix.

The Common Raven is found in every Province and Territory in Canada year-round. They are gregarious,calling other ravens to kill sites - thus exhibiting the friendly, helpful nature we Canadians wish to portray.
They are scavengers - cleaning up garbage and road kills that would otherwise rot slowly in our ditches and roadsides.
They have a variety of very expressive calls and are extremely intelligent birds. Have you noticed that you rarely see a road-killed raven despite the large numbers of these birds patrolling our highways in search of food? Their presence at moose carcasses in Northern Ontario has guided many game wardens to the site of an illegal kill.
And they are a beautiful bird!

A Highly intelligent bird

It would be nice to be represented by a genius!

C'est un oiseau très intelligent

"kohlrabenschwarz" is the coolest word you'll ever see and it translates to raven black so, there you go.

"A key figure in Northwest Coast legends, Raven is involved in many creation stories and is also recognized as the bringer of light as it is said that the Raven released the sun and moon." extracted from SLCC web site

Raven is the most clever bird among other birds. Looney has an unfortunate association with "insane". Owl is Quebec's provincial bird. Goose has a hostile behaviour. Chickadee and Gray jay are too cute

Ils nichent dans l'ensemble du Canada et sont des résidents permanents : ils hivernent dans leur aire de nidification.
En pleine ville,c'est le seul oiseau qui survole et se pose aux environs d'où j'habite et ce,peu importe la saison.Il est fidèle,majestueux et sa voix rauque
m'impressionne.

This intelligent bird is found throughout Canada.
It is highly esteemed in native tradition and has survived as a mischievous tricksteer for centuries.

There is nothing more remarkable or intelligent than a raven in the bird world! They live coast to coast to coast! It's the obvious choice!

Much maligned and misunderstood. A beautiful, intelligent animal.

The raven is Intelligent and industrious, lives all across Canada, from sea to sea to sea, and is of great significance to First Nations nb legend of the Raven and the First Man.
The Raven has a real presence and I've seen them standing up to eagles, not a bad metaphor for our place in the continent.

Everybody loves a raven, nobody likes a crow

The raven is not an especially attractive bird. It makes up for it by its smarts. Clever, innovative, logical, persistent - it has all these qualities and has a history in native culture. A smart bird who demands respect.

the common raven is amazing, friendly, cooperative with others, there adaptive to different weather, they live around humans they like the out doors.

I think he common raven because it is very intelligent.

The Raven is a bird that was highly respected by Canada's first nations people. It inhabits Canada from coast to coast and to the territories.
A highly intelligent bird that provides a service as a carrion eater.
A true Canadian bird which understands both official languages!!
In my heart the Raven is our national bird!
Jim Brown

The raven occurs across Canada and must be the most intelligent bird in the country if not in North America. I've seen them open coolers, use sticks, and as captive animals they can be taught words. They are boisterous as well as curious. Their beauty is readily apparent as they strut around with their deep black feathers showing purple and shifting highlights as they strut in the sun. As revealed in the discovery of raven skeletons in 10,500 year old archaeological deposits at Charlie Lake Cave in northern British Columbia, and as shown with their significance in the historical legends of First Nations, people in Canada have long recognized their unique qualities.

inhabits most of Canada
intelligent
native story line

Compte tenu qu'il s'agit d'un oiseaux pouvant résider à l'année au Canada, qu'il est présent sur l'ensemble du territoire canadien, qu'il est l'un des oiseaux les plus intelligents et ingénieux et qu'il était vénéré par les peuples des premieres-nations, je crois qu'il ferait un très bon candidat pour le rôle d'emblème du Canada.

Clever , cunning and majestic bird! I saw it's works living 10 yrs in YK and have never met a smarter bird !!!

Trickster raven!

I've watched ravens play in updrafts and work in packs to distract the neighbour's dog so they could steal his kibble. I've heard them make more noises that are un-birdlike than any other bird and dance on our roof like they were wearing cowboy boots. I've watched them huddle on the tops of buildings in Yellowknife, and head out of town at dusk to wherever ravens go, always in a group. I've watched humans go to great lengths to keep ravens out of their garbage, mostly in vain. Any bird that plays just because they can, outwits the family pet, can imitate noises and can even outwit humans gets my vote for National Bird of Canada.

Quoth the Raven "never more."

This very intelligent bird lives in families and makes some of the funniest sounds I have ever heard from a bird. Pops, caws, car horns...

The Raven should be Canada's National Bird.
When living near Bald Eagles (like in Bella Bella), Ravens dominate their larger and more flashy neighbours through superior intelligence, skills and teamwork - like the way Canadian hockey teams dominate the USA groups of individualistic players!
Like Ravens versus Bald Eagles, Canadians know that we are superior to Americans even if we're not as glamorous!

Je choisi le Grand corbeau, parce qu'il se démarque du fait qu'il est intelligent, il résiste aux grands froids du Canada. Il n'est pas populaire, il gagne à être connu. Un grand observateur, il est robuste, résident permanent et pour finir j'aime bien sa réputation mythique qui le distingue des autres oiseaux. En effet, il est reconnu pour être une espèce qui représente la mémoire et même créateur du monde!

No bird represents us more. Historically and present day. Its a bird that symbolizes strength, intelligence and beauty. It balances the other symbols of Canada with a bit more edge and power than the others.

Most Canadians can't tell a raven from a crow. They are both big black noisy birds but there the similarity ends. The crow does represent a large number of Canadians. They are both "snowbirds" spending summers in Canada and winters in the United States because they can't take the cold and snow.
The Raven however lives everywhere in Canada and survives the worst the climate can dish out.
The Raven may not be popular because of its colour but unlike the crow it is beautiful in the air. It performs impressive aerial acrobatics in pairs during mating season. The family raises two or three offspring every year and the young stay with the parents for a year or two.
Ravens talk, not just caw and have a considerable vocabulary which they will use to converse with humans who have taken the trouble to make their acquaintance.
The Raven may not win but it should.

The Raven is a very intelligent and resourceful bird. Canadians are hearty and clever, just like the Raven, which is why it is a great choice for our national bird.

The raven is the hardiest bird there is. It can survive in even the harshest arctic climates. Did you know that it is the only bird that uses language to communicate, not just sound and song. The bird has strong role in aboriginal cultures and its intelligence is noted as its role is the trickster.

How can it not be this incredible bird! Smarter than my dog! Spiritually significant to the Aboriginal People!

This bird is tough, smart, adaptable and unique! This bird survives and thrives in some of the most isolated and cold parts of our country, just like so many Canadians

The raven is mysterious, extremely clever and steeped in myth. Its voice is unique and beautiful. It survives and flourishes both in the wild and in the city, both in the summer and especially in the winter. They fly high and loom large.

Voted corvid. This was a good rep.

The raven stays here all year as opposed to those birds that fly south for the winter. They also speak many languages to support Canada's multi cultures. They also protect the environment by disposing of road kill.. The Raven is well respected in many native ceremonies and is protected from unlawful hunters.

The Raven is beautiful and mysterious. Clever and amusing. And made of tough stuff which we Canadians have to be especially this winter. It's an instantly recognizable bird in a way that the Gray Jay isn't. And the Raven is the only Corvid in this contest. A vote for Raven is a vote for crows. Crows are everywhere, crows have a distinctive sound, crows are with us and of us all the time. Everybody knows crows. And yet they are ingenious and beautiful. Those jet black feathers! Crows/ravens are the perfect Canadian bird because they are part of every day life in (most) of this contrary, without being at all ordinary.

Ravens have a folkloric, mystical and literary connotation. Most of which isn't specifically Canadian. But let's grab hold of this hunk of world/European culture that is certainly part of us, with both hands. And make one of the most recognizable and elegant creatures in world culture our own.

The raven is the trixter that lights my eyes up with its antics. It's cry is gravelly and soothing, not jarring like other birds. It imitates the cries of our dogs, cats, vehicles, and sometimes citizens. It is that way that it let's us know that it is listening, and that nature is us and we are nature. This is the bird that let's me I am home, no matter where I am.

A Notherner Through and Through

CACKAW! CACKAW! SQUAAAAAAAAACK! CAW CAW CAW CACKAW! SQUAAAAAAAAAAACK!

http://edgeyk.com/article/go-ravens-vote-early-and-vote-often-for-canadas-national-bird/

GO RAVENS: VOTE EARLY AND VOTE OFTEN FOR CANADA’S NATIONAL BIRD
Power-outage-causing symbol of Yellowknife is on the ballot, but needs your support to win

Picture this: it’s bird prom night and over 450 different species are squawking their way around the gymnasium ahead of the big announcement of bird prom king or queen. The Common Loon is strutting confidently. “I’m so handsome, I have to win,” he says, “and I’m on the Loonie.” Canada Goose, she’s looking beautiful as always. “I have Canada in my name,” she says smugly, “and they named a jacket after me.”

Raven is hanging out in the bathroom smoking cigarettes. It’s not like he cares.

The big moment comes. The bespectacled great horned owl flutters up to the microphone. “The winner is… Raven!” she says with astonishment.

He must have stuffed the box, that trickster.

That’s pretty much the scenario Yellowknife city councillor Dan Wong is hoping for (minus the ballot stuffing) in Canada’s great ornithological popularity contest. The Royal Canadian Geographical Society is hosting an online vote to pick a national bird ahead of the country’s 150th anniversary in 2017. Wong, and Whitehorse city councillor John Streicker, are trying to get Northerners to vote en masse for the northern bird.

“The raven is a resilient, adaptable and intelligent bird and I think that summarizes Canadians,” says Wong. “There is the ptarmigan. They’re pretty awesome and cute, and also very tasty. But I’d be surprised if other Canadians know what a ptarmigan is.”

Wong and his pro-raven friends have their work cut out. Right now, the common loon, with its PR head start courtesy of the Canadian Mint, is leading the flock with around 6,750 votes. It is followed by the snowy owl, the grey jay and the rather obvious Canada goose, all with over 2,000 votes. The raven is currently nestled down around 1,000.

“A lot of people try to demonize the raven, call it mischievous and inelegant, so I think the raven is due for a serious public relations boost,” said Wong.

Why go raven?

Well, for one thing, they’re almost everywhere in the country. And who wouldn’t want our civic bird, and the source of most of our power outages, as our national bird?

Then there’s the raven’s first-rate mythological pedigree. In many Inuit and First Nations stories, the raven is the creator of the world or the being who brings light. That said, in many stories he’s also a trickster driven by insatiable greed — perhaps not the image Canadians want to cultivate following an impressive win for the worst environmental record in the developed world.

Further afield, a raven was the first bird off of Noah’s Ark. And according to rabbinical tradition, ravens were one of only three couples on the ark to get frisky, to Noah’s prudish consternation. Sexually liberated? That’s what people say about Canadians, right?

Despite the raven’s mere 1,000 votes, the bird is getting some illustrious support. Noah Richler, son of Mordecai Richler, has come to its defense on the Canadian Geographical Society website: “Above all, Raven is resourceful, a survivor, as the territory compels most Canadians to be… [The] tendency — to take to the road out of necessity and then return home and relate the things he’s seen — is an atavistic Canadian one of hunting and gathering. From the first Thule hunters to the Newfoundlanders of today travelling to Alberta to hunt and gather work, it has been the Canadian’s lot to scour the land for opportunity, and then to bring home a tall tale or two.”

Why the raven might win

Along with the slightly un-Canadian mythological association with trickiness and fecundity, in reality ravens don’t act like the stereotypical mild-mannered Canadian at all.

According to an article from natureworldnews.com, “It appears that ravens may be even more viciously political than your average high school drama queen. That’s at least according to a new study of these highly intelligent birds, who appear to have a social system that’s characterized by alliances, betrayal, and sabotage between ‘friends.'”

Apparently, raven society is a bit like 18th-century England: food, mating privileges and protection are all distributed within strictly defined hierarchies. When lower-class ravens try mingling beyond their means, other ravens are quick to attack them and put them back in their place.

That doesn’t seem to square with the common self-perception of Canada as a relatively equal place (however, deluded that may be). But, hey I’m sure common loons are mean-spirited too.

To vote for raven, check out the Royal Canadian Geographical Society’s National Bird Project.

No other bird has as much character as the Raven. They are social, taciturn, exuberant, and just the right amount of arrogant. Visiting the dump, drive through or kennel would not be complete without their antics. They steal food, beg, trick, and in some cases, cause city-wide power outages. No life would not be complete without our favourite character, the Raven.

Un oiseau très intelligent qu'on retrouve partout au Canada.

The Raven is in all parts of Canada, is important in most cultures, particularly first nations. It's smart, sociable, uses language well, playful. Does good parenting. Seems to have a sense of humour.

Intelligent, resourceful, native throughout Canada and holds significance to our First Nations.

What else could you ask for.

They're powerful, intelligent, and bad ass.

The raven is a great representative for Canada. Sticks around all winter, is smart, smart, smart and has aboriginal connections as well.

Corbeau noir,

Un oiseau très intelligent. Ils ont une mémoire fénoménale. Peux survivre partout au Canada. Il reste parmi nous toute l'année. ILs aiment travailler en équipe. Si un corbeau meurt aucun corbeau ne viendra le manger. Je voudrais croire que comme notre pays les corbeaux peuvent vivre en unisson.

C'est un oiseau facinant.

Parce que c'est un oiseau majestueux, très intelligent, ancré dans les légendes des plus anciens habitants de notre terre qu'il habite d'ailleurs à longueur d'année et d'un océan à l'autre.

I have always thought the raven to be a fascinating, smart, curious yet regal bird. For me, the link of the raven to indigenous people of Canada always promotes a mysterious, wise and spiritual image. Love to hear it fly by ...the power and strength of its wings grabs and holds my attention. What a mighty bird the raven is.

Le grand corbeau c'est lui, le grand noir sorti de la dernière nuit, qui annonce le lever du jour. Que ce soit en Gaspésie, à Rimouski ou dans l'ouest, il est toujours là pour dire que la nature est florissante et qu'elle est précieuse pour toutes les espèces qui partage le même écosystème. Que tu sois la figure dominante sur une des nombreuses peintures à l'huile faites par mon père ou tout près de ma fenêtre à indiquer ta présence par ton chant imposant et surprenant, j'aime sentir la grandeur de la vie que tu exprimes et ta détermination à nous dire que le ciel est un espace à préserver. Ce ciel immense et aussi, si fragile, tu nous demandes surtout, de le préserver pour toutes les espèces d'oiseaux qui sont sur ta route. Pour les plus vulnérables jusqu'aux plus robustes des espèces, ton inquiétude t'oblige à imposer ce croassement rauque et grave. Merci grand corbeau de ta présence bienveillante, pour ton chant qui ne peut passer inaperçu, pour ta robustesse et la beauté de ton existence parmi nous.

Pour son intelligence, pour son occupation du territoire, pour sa résilience, pour son incroyable vocabulaire, pour le plaisir de le voir s'amuser en vol et pour sa noire beauté.

The Raven lives throughout Canada and is blessed with great intelligence, very inquisitive, acrobatic, has interesting vocalizations and takes time to play. I saw one lift off a boat shed in Sointula with a cedar shake in its claws riding it in the wind like a surf board for about 30 seconds before setting it back down on the roof. I wish I had my camera with us that day.

comme les canadien il en a partout dans le nord le sud meme dans d'autre pays!!

Crows are smart, endearing, fun loving, and capable of solving problems dogs can't figure out. They're also very resourceful and communal. On top of that, it's a bird people recognize and most Canadians have probably seen.

Ravens have one of the most recognizable croaks in the world. People might think they're just large versions of a crow, but they aren't half as noisy, nor do they fly around in packs pestering other birds. They keep to themselves. They're beautiful and sleek. And they're smart.

Not only that, but ravens have all sorts of cool historical mentions on their side: Edgar Allen Poe wrote one of his most famous poems using the raven as the central image, Shakespeare uses them in his plays in delightfully foreboding ways, and they have their own residence in the UK (the Tower in London).

Is that a cool pedigree or what? I think they deserve to be our national bird.

Best bird ever

i think b/c it is in every province and territory.

I think this should be the countries national bird because it is one of the smartest birds ever to live

I would like to vote for the raven, as it is common in all Canadian provinces & territories (including Nunavut!), and has a particular resonance for many first nations across Canada.

I can't think of a better national bird!

oiseau très intelligent, se retrouve sur tout le territoire et à l'année.

Je choisis le grand corbeau car on le trouve partout au Canada. C'est un oiseau d'une grande intelligence qui sait s'adapter à son environnement. De plus, les Premières Nations le révèrent.

Oiseau très intelligent. Laissons l'intelligence représenter notre pays.

Ravens are the smartest birds that I know. They are loyal to their partner, they are survivors and will survive all that man can throw at them. They have a great sense of humour.A delight to observe.Definitely my most fav bird.

Il y en a partout au Canada

Je choisis le corbeau. Oiseau qui ne paie pas de mine mais qui est vraiment intelligent.

From the northern tip of Ellesmere Island to the 60th parallel, this is the only bird I know of that truly ranges throughout our country. As a bonus, it is highly intelligent.

J'adore ce grand oiseau mystérieux! Il se retrouve partout au Canada et est l'un des oiseaux les plus intelligents! De plus, il n'est pas déjà un emblème d'une autre province. Faisons honeur à cet oiseau majestueux !

Raven the Trickster!!!

Raven stole the sun and gave us light.

The raven is the perfect sort of bird to represent Canada; it is intelligent, cunning, and is present in every province and territory. It speaks to us in all seasons, not just the winter. And of course, our indigenous brothers and sisters have many stories to tell about the raven.

The common raven is a bird that has featured widely in aboriginal legends and folklore. This bird is very smart and very entertaining and cold tolerant! I live in Yellowknife, NT and I notice the ravens who live in and around our small city. They work together in pairs to snatch food. For example, one will tease a dog, while the other raids his dog food dish! Last week, a raven was sitting on a branch of one of my pine trees and as I walked down the driveway s/he flew off, causing the branch to move and dump a considerable pile of snow on my head…what timing! That raven really must have had a good chuckle at my expense. They also make an amazing array of sounds. I love to hear their clucks, guttural gulps and squawks. Ravens nest in the late winter, and literally get a jump on spring by having their chicks hatch while there is still snow on the ground. I once saw a raven flying with a twig in it's beak, and it was early March (which is still winter in the NWT)!

Looking forward to seeing how the contest turns out! My vote will continue to support the raven as long as possible.

Je vote pour le Grand Corbeau, parce que c'est un oiseau très intelligent, qu'il passe l'hiver au Canada et qu'il est partout au Canada. En plus, il est beau. Et j'aime son cri rauque.

Pour sa majesté et sa grande intelligence

Le corbeau est un des oiseaux les plus intelligents.

Aussi loin que je me souviens, j'ai toujours adore les corneilles et les corbeaux.

J'adore cet oiseau discret que l'on confond trop souvent avec la corneille. il est magnifique et il ne nous quitte pas une fois la froidure arrivée.

The raven has such meaning and such history. It's aboriginal tales make it a bird of the land.

Simply put, the Raven possess characteristics like no other bird in Canada: legendary intelligence, socialization of team work, mythology of First Nations culture and the widest range, which includes the high arctic.

Le corbeau est un animal respecté par les amérindiens pour son intelligence et son adaptabilité...de plus, il doit être protégé.
Merci

À chaque été au chalet, nous avons la chance de suivre un couple avec leurs petits.

C'est un grand oiseau fort, noble et intelligent.

Il s'agit d'un oiseau extrêmement intelligent.

Lives in the wild, intelligent, revered by First Nations peoples, I'd put one on the flag.

parce que c'est un oiseau intelligent que l'on retrouve partout au Canada.

The Raven is smart/intelligent; not showy (modest) and has a lot of "Canadian" traits.

Ici c'est ce que je vois le plus souvent, oiseaux intelligent.

The Raven is truly a national bird, as like the Canadian people, it lives in forested and unforested areas, near the ocean or not, from our artic coast to the Pacific coast and across the country to Newfoundland and the Atlantic coast. It lives in First Nations mythology and Aesop's fables, thus joining Canada's First Peoples with those who came later. Ravens can even be found in Africa, birthplace of all humanity. As are Canadians, Ravens are clever and adapt to many habitats, using tools that come to hand to accomplish their objectives.

Un des rares animal qui reste actif par les froids polaires de l'hiver Québécois. Souvent le seul compagnon de mes excursions hivernales.

Parce que el corbeau est partout au Canada, pour sa majesté dans les airs et pour sa très grande intelligence.

L'Intelligence de cet oiseau

Je suis en admiration devant cet oiseaux, il est brillant, noble et fier.

Comme c'est un oiseau très intelligent qui peut servir à retrouver des gens perdus en forêt,je trouve qu'il serait justicieux de le choisir!

Le Grand Corbeau se retrouve dans tout le Canada, et y demeure tout l'hiver. Le fait d'être un oiseau qui ne migre pas à la chaleur, le froid venu, est un point important. "Mon pays c'est l'hiver " disait Vigneau. Ce bel aviaire a toison noire lustrée a mauvaise presse puisqu'on s'attarde à sa réputation de charognard. Mais pourquoi est-il si terrible de se nourrir d'animaux mort les humains le font eux mêmes, mais dans une assiette. Par ailleurs, soulignons que le Grand Corbeau est omnivore puisqu'il se nourri aussi de céréales, de petits fruits etc. tout comme l'homme d'ailleurs. Depuis quelques années il est maintenant reconnnu pour son intelligence remarquable par exemple il est dressé avec succès, afin de retrouver des personnes disparues. Il est temps de réhabiliter la réputation de ce superbe oiseaux et même de lui permettre de monter sur le podiom honorable " d'oiseau emblème du Canada".

Un des oiseaux des plus intelligents, qui existent sur terre.
Selon les Haïda, c'est lui, qui a amené la lumière sur terre.
C'est lui aussi, qui vole et accompagne les hommes, sur les plus hautes montagnes du monde.

Grand symbole des forces de la nature, grand recycleur....
Un oiseaux, débrouillard, digne, fidèle et sa couleur noir corbeau brille sous le soleil.
Quoi dire de plus.

Le corbeau est un oiseau qui vit a l'année au pays ce qui en fait un habitant réel du Canada.
Il est très intelligent et très opportuniste.
Il sait aussi très bien s'adapter à son rude environnement.
Il a une prestance et une élégance au vol. On le remarque a coup sûr.
Malgré la fable du renard et du corbeau, le plus intelligent des 2 est sûrement le corbeau.
C'est mon choix sans hésitation.
Il représente bien le Canada, pour toutes ces qualités.

C'est un oiseau intelligent, perspicace et tenace. Il représente bien le peuple canadien.

C'est un oiseau intelligent, de grands espaces, solitaire...Cet oiseau incarne la solitude humaine, l'inventivité et la spiritualité dont on devrait s'imprégner.

Pour son intelligence, isa capacité a résoudre des problèmes, sa capacité pour les petits de jouer, ses acrobaties aériennes et enfin il passe l'hiver avec nous.

Les grands totems aborigènes nous montres la voie. A nous de suivre leur tracé. Quelques Canadien que ce soit, qui c'est aventuré en forêt à entendu le son, dirais-je, la voie de ce grand oiseau intelligent.

Il est immense, tenace dans le froid. Mange de tout et immitateur.

Intelligent, répandu a travers le Canada, chant particulier

Oiseau mal aimé, il est doté d'une intelligence remarquable. Il est présent tout au long de l'année d'un océan à l'autre.
Son chant pas très mélodieux j'en conviens me rappelle sa force de survie affrontant les rigueurs de nos hivers.

Il possède toutes les qualités pour être ambassadeur du Canada.

- Il est présent à l'année.
- Sa répartition géographique est au-de-là des frontières provincial, elle est d'un océan à l'autre.
- C'est un oiseau fort.
- C'est un oiseau que j'aime.

Le corbeau est l'oiseau des grands espaces et des forêts profondes, tout à fait à l'image du pays.
Il est aussi un oiseau extrèmement original par son intelligence très développée.
Il est beau avec sa tenue de soirée permanente et ne se prend pas pour un autre.
Son cri est particulier et j'admire son caractère enjoué.

C'est de loin mon oiseau préféré depuis toujours!

Partout au Canada, intelligent et l'élire nous affranchira des préjugés stupides que nous avons envers les oiseaux noirs.

This bird are the most intelligent and It live until from the extreme north of the Canadian Artic to the south border and from an ocean to the other. Il occupe tout le territoire Canadien. Il symbolise la résistance l'intégration et l'intelligence des Canadiens.

Le grand corbeau est présent partout au canada, même dans le grand nord sous l'appellation "Raven". C'est un oiseau très intelligent, qui s’adapte et s’intègre à son environnement sans le détruire ou causer de nuisance. Pour les non-initiés, c’est un oiseau noir, quelconque et peu attrayant. Quand on s’y intéresse, c’est un oiseau magnifique et fascinant.

Du nord au sud, de l'est à l'ouest, cet oiseau est présent et mal aimé. Il a une présence majestueuse.

Il est très intelligent. Il est impressionnant par sa grosseur, son cris, il invite les humains à l`introspection selon nos grands sages les Amérindiens. Revalorisons les Premières Nations.

Le grand corbeau, étant présent sur tout le territoire canadien, semble un choix intéressant. Mal aimé à cause de sa couleur noire, c'est un oiseau reconnu pour son intelligence assez impressionante. Il mérite notre respect et notre admiration

C'est un oiseau que l'on retrouve d'un bout à l'autre du pays et c'est un oiseau qui est très intelligent merci il y a aussi le ménageai du Canada merci

Ce majestueux oiseau ne mérite pas sa mauvaise réputation. il est très intelligent et surtout il ne quitte pas le pays durant l'hiver, il est adapté à notre climat tout comme nous. :)

Référé par les chroniqueurs de catherine périn...Corbeau est un oiseau de forêt et ils sont entrain de les élever pour retrouver des enfants perdus dans les forêts..

le plus intelligent

Le corbeau était l'embleme des premiers arrivants europeens (Viking) à l'anse au Medow, Terre-Neuve vers l'an mille.

Mon vote va au grand corbeau, cet oiseau si intelligent qui porte malheureusement une mauvaise réputation depuis trop longtemps.

J'adore entendre ces oiseaux se parler dans le grand nord!

Raven is trickster, in some west coast first nations mythology and spirituality held to be the creator or human life or at least the what made it possible. Each grouping in different places has different songs and they use to communicate with each other to pass along information and perhaps learning of food caches and more our problem as humans is we don't know as we haven't studied that. Though to listen to Raven, the song is different from valley to valley on Vancouver Island where I live and from fjord to fjord on the mainland where I travelled extensively and island to island off the west coast forming the inside passage where I worked extensively before I retired. Some use sticks to fashion simple tools of sorts for different things unique to different locations where different songs exist which leads me to the question of does Raven form different cultures in a similar fashion to orca pods who fashion different hunting styles unique to those pods which require learning. This appears to be happening among different song groups of Raven. Or at least this blue eyed white man from Europe is noticing it. Raven is cultured. So, perhaps is Raven's distant relative Crow.

One of the smartest birds I have had the privilege to observe!

Ravens commit for life, they love to play (one of very few species of birds to be witnessed doing so), are very intelligent, born competitors and a myriad of other things.

le grand corbeau est l'oiseau le plus intelligent des oiseaux

they're awesome, best bird

After seeing these birds (and hearing them) in. Whitehorse last year, they have become my favourite. They never fail to bring a smile.

I call the crows around my home this small murder seem to come.

This is the clear choice... Firstly, Black-capped Chickadee and Grey Jay are 2 of my top 3 birds in Canada... But Common Raven is the clear choice. It occurs in every province and territory, AND has significant importance, is a totem, to our First Nations people. Common Raven really should be our National Bird.

j'aime cet oiseau parce que il est intelligent.

The raven, sometimes called the Rook has a card game named after it that is played by hundreds of thousands of Canadians. The many hours of enjoyment this bird has brought to Canadians earns it a nomination as our first bird.
Go Ravens go!

The Raven is not only beautiful, but amazingly intelligent.

Lifetime pair bonds, co-operative activities, problem/puzzle solving skills
and an extraordinary language in spring = they visit with each other!
First Nations peoples have known these things for thousands of years.

Intelligent,hardy,adaptable,found in all provinces and territories and honours our native our Indian ancestors who consider the bird sacred as the earth we live on.

Raven is found in most of Canada. Connection to first nations heritage is important.

Playful and mischievous, the Raven rules in many parts of Canada. They are intelligent, often working together to achieve goals - like teasing cats and dogs. On a windy day they play on the wind. Best of all, they are scavengers that work hard at keeping our environment clean.

I am raving about the Common Raven, Canada's most intelligent bird. Coast to coast to coast it is our remarkable for its affinity to mankind - our trusted and much admired companion.

I spent most of my life in Yellowknife, and worked in the high arctic. Ravens are the toughest, smartest birds out there. Ask any Yellowknifer - they will have a raven story.

I feel the Common Raven should be the next national bird for the following reasons. 1. They are the ultimate survivor, always foraging for food. 2. They are highly communal and are amazing parents. 3.They are natures warning system.(when I'm out working in the yard, they triangulate around me & my property & if there is any danger at all, they sound the alarm. Sometimes it could be just a house cat, but 9 out of ten times, it's either a fox, coyote or bear. I have a Chihuahua, so I always listen to the ravens, as does my dog. They are never wrong. 4. They are extremely intelligent & can use tools in order to get their food. 5. There was one that hung out at a Middle School for years & was able to say hello to the children in order for them to give him scraps. It started off as him just being around the playground daily, & eventually once the little kids all saw him, they'd go as close as they could & say hello & the Raven eventually learned that him saying hello got him treats. 6. They are an extremely untrusting bird, therefor, the ultimate survivor. 7. They chase predator bird out of the area. I have an Osprey & Peregrine Falcons that frequent my yard & when they do, the Ravens chase them away from the area. They coincide with the Blue Jays nicely in my yard. 8. They are excellent mimickers & have a broad range of noises for communicating. 9. Lastly, they are a gorgeous bird that signifies Canada's strength in their people & their freedom. Please give the Raven consideration, as it is a very useful bird, not just a pretty bird to look at.

Such a ubiquitous and intelligent bird and the subject of much lore. This is Canada's bird!!

In Nuxalk territory (where I live) Raven brought Light to the World and is honoured for that. As a wildlife observer/photographer in this area, I find Raven to be the most brilliant/intelligent of Creatures.

I'm in a hurry and running late. Lets just go with, because this bird rocks

Not as ugly as a Turkey Vulture, smart as a crow, tough as a hockey player, found in every jurisdiction, and faithful to the country: should be a clear choice for everyone. Let's hear it for the Common Raven.

They represent every province & territory.

Common Raven is arguably the smartest bird in Canada. It's range includes all provinces and territories and lives here year round.

To me the raven is a regal bird. It is among the songbirds one of the very few who remain in Canada throughout the year, a testament to its resourcefulness and tenacity. In the folklore of our Native Canadians the Raven is revered and honored being found at the top of totems on many occasions. The sheer intelligence of the Raven is evident in its daily living activities and its ability to mimic is beyond comprehension. I recall a trip made to the Yukon Territories in 1997 where one morning in Dawson City I was awoken by what I thought was a large dog barking, further investigation revealed that it was in fact a large Raven announcing his presence to the world by mimicking a barking dog, amazing!
Majestic, intelligent, courageous, tenacious, a survivor, and found across Canada in all environments. These are my reasons for voting for RAVEN.

I am voting for the raven - the mythology of summer, the trickster and the creator myths

Même si cet oiseau est considéré comme un oiseau noir il mérite tout notre respect.
Avec le corbeau il est un oiseau d'une grande intelligence, emblème totemique pour les premières nations et présent dans toutes les régions du Canada toute l'année.

Il a aussi une longue longévité, propre aux Canadiens, et peux facilement fonctionner en groupe ou en solitaire.

Il est notre oiseau emblématique sans contredit.

Isabelle Godin

I love the Raven. Absolutely my favorite bird. what else is there to say, they are BEAUTIFUL.

Common Raven, as Canada’s National Bird
Canada’s National Bird emblem must be a bird that doesn't forsake the country in the winter or in any other season. It should be resident to the majority of the country, and it ought to be iconic. An animal of legend, story and poetry. It should be compatible with Canadians, it would be a shame if it was rare or threatened by our activities.
The Common Raven is an admirable bird, capable of aerobatic excellence, tough and dare I say personable. That is they do relate, will become accustomed and will use our works for their advantage. As a keystone predator, adventitious scavenger and innovative survivor they perform a great service to Canada and the Canadian environment in every region of the country. If I were given a choice of what animal I would be it would be the Raven. Ravens have the advantage of virtually the whole of the northern hemisphere for range and would represent Canada well as a northern icon. At times the voice of the raven can be a bit harsh, but is often varied and instrumental. Anyone who has seen the aerobatic displays of ravens, often given as a display to us as audience, will attest to their agility, power and imagination. No other bird is as dedicated to the geography of Canada than the Common Raven. They will entertain us, challenge us and clean up after us. The Common Raven mythical in first nations lore, known by us all, the far north, the country and city will represent Canada well as its National Bird.

Hardy,resourceful and encompassing the entire Canadian landscape year round makes the raven the only true candidate for Canada's national bird.

I wanted to vote for the black billed magpie, but they were not on the list. These birds are persecuted by man. Just because they are noisy. And every year there is so many people who want them eradicated. Well they can survive winter weather and I feed them cat food that I soak in water so they can digest it better. They have beautiful feathers that are iridescent. Well do magpies drive gas guzzling vehicles spewing oil on the ground? Do magpies mow down large swaths of forests to wipe their ass? Do magpies drain wetlands to put up a shopping center. Man is so bad for the planet and to the wildlife that we do not want to share it with. Sorry for ranting but I hate the way man treats magpies and all other wildlife.

It is clever, here all year, and was respected by the First Nations people.

I first got to know Ravens while working in the Arctic, where they stay year round, never going south for the winter. They are truly brilliant, and often opportunistic, survivors. Plus they clean up our garbage left all over our cities and towns, thus providing a very useful service. Where Raven is there is magic!

Ravens came to Fairview about 5 years after I moved here. I have enjoyed seeing them, listening to them and feeding them. They clean up the many animals killed on our roads. That is a service that is a huge benefit to our area.

The raven has modest plumage but its personality is magnificent. Well reknowned for mimicry and a gentle trickery I think this bird's arguable sense of humour and prominence in the mythology of the first peoples makes it a great representative of the Canadian character. All substance, no flash!

The smartest and most resourceful of the birds I know, and one of the few that brave the harsh winters with the rest of us!

Love ravens, and as an artist, find them stunningly beautiful, and I paint them all the time. Smart too. Living on the Alberta prairies all my life, I had to go to the mountains to see (and hear them...what a treat that is!), but the past 5 years, they've moved out here to join us on the prairie. They stay all year too, which is a credit to their toughness. So, much as I love SO many bird species.... Ravens get my vote

There is nothing "common" about the Raven. Intelligent, hardy, adventurous and playful, the Raven is a legendary part of our native lore and a proud example of Canadian strength and character.
VOTE RAVEN!

The Raven is quintessetial Canadian - it does not migrate in the winter but sticks it out all year round, has great aboriginal connections and is one of the smartest birds I have ever seen in action.

The Common Raven will is the most deserving species.

The Raven’s resourcefulness, intelligence and geographic range speak to this. Does any other national bird candidate center its continental range to virtually the entire country? Many species are widespread but do they live here for the entire year? Or do they run for warmer climes when the mercury drops…

How many of the candidates can thrive, year-round, in habitats ranging from the treeless tundra to our urban centers? The Raven is here year round.

It was here when our first peoples walked across the Bering Strait land bridge. They knew the Raven was special and they honored it in their mythology. So too did their old-world cousins, the Celts, Romans, Scandinavians and Siberian tribes to name a few.

The Raven is the best possible symbol of what we Canadians SHOULD be. Tough, resourceful and intelligent. Are these worthy national attributes? How about playful, graceful and strong? Ravens are all those things.

The alternative is to go with a species that runs from the cold or is found only in a part of the country. Is that the kind of Canadian you want to be?

The Ravan the truly Canadian bird.

The Raven is one of our most intelligent birds and thus possesses a trait that most Canadians admire. This bird is also a year round resident braving the harsh Canadian winter with fortitude and resilience - lesson to the rest of us that we are part of an northern nation and that we are capable of enjoying all four seasons. This large black bird has presence. Beyond its size and colour and afore mentioned qualities it radiates confidence as it looks you straight in the eye whenever we meet. This bird ranges across our country and thus is a familiar resident across our country. It lives almost everywhere.

The Raven in my mind wins by a landslide. It is not a snowbird and it has many great qualities that Canadians admire.

Bill Reid would be proud.

Amazing bird Tough Resourceful Persistent and is a Canadian "citizen" all year long and doesn't run for cover when the sun goes away and the weather turns cold.

This Raven’s resourcefulness, intelligence and geographic range speak to its applicability as a truly representative Canadian national bird.

The raven thrives in every climate and every ecosystem Canada has to offer. From mountain pass to tundra to urban landscape, the raven has adapted and indeed can be found 12 months of the year.

The raven thrives in singles in small groups and in large numbers demonstrating independence, cooperation and gregariousness all traits that make any Canadian immediately recognisable and successful.

No interloper, the raven has been here since before the first peoples made their way across the continent. Their ingenuity, character and resilience have left an indelible mark on the social and cultural stories of every culture to grace the Canadian landscape since.

Raven’s resourcefulness, intelligence and geographic range speak to this, an amazing bird!

Ravens play.

The Raven would be the best bird species to reflect a national designation. The range of Raven occurs in all all provinces and teritories in Canada. No other bird in Canada does this. And it is a bird that crosses the boarder into the United States, south to the lower States and north into Alaska - reflecting Canadian value of wanting to have relations with adjoining nations. Raven are a truly northern bird, withstaning northern winter and summer weather too. The Raven are intelligent and can be found in rural and urban settings, adapting to niches where we have built human communities. The Raven is already recongnized in many Canadian aboriginal myths and legends. When you see Raven they flock in small numbers in our country, reflecting a sense of individuals living within their nation. They have a beautiful voice and calls that be heard in their habitat.

I would be proud to be Raven. It is the most aspirational of the birds here. It could stand for both what we are and what we should be.

I like the fact that Ravens are found across the country, in all climates. They are winter survivors. They are highly intelligent and known to solve complex problems, and they have a complex social structure. They are also of significant spiritual significance to many of our first nations people. After all, according to legend it was Raven who created the world and who brought the sun, and who taught humans how to make fire, among other things. I can think of no better national bird than this one.

A very wise and commonly seen bird in Canada, also symbolic in many First Peoples stories

Truly represents Canada, found in all areas of the country and does not migrate.

I will keep it short. Raven's are increadibly intelligent birds and Canadians are increadibly intelligent mammals. We seem to go together.

They are incredibly smart and resourceful.

The Common Raven is the most intelligent bird on this entire list. It is adaptable (like Canadians), able to survive our harsh winters (unlike the birds that fly South), and forms life-long bonds with it's mate. They display impressive aerobatic skills, rivaling even the most graceful birds of prey. They have a wide range of vocalizations to suit whatever situation they find themselves in. They have a unique place is First Nations folklore, as well as Norse mythology (Odin's ravens: Muginn and Huninn). Add the fact that this bird's range covers the Northern hemisphere, and Canada already has an ambassador present all over the world.

The Raven is a mystical, a messenger, a team player and very intelligent. All Canadian traits.

The raven is ubiquitous. Having spent time on north Baffin Island, the raven is iconic in its ability to 'speak to us' wherever we are in this huge country.

The Raven is intelligent, resourceful, and fearless. Much like Canadians.

Ravens and crows are amongst the smartest birds! Great family values....fantastic communicators, good sense of humour. Awesome squawkers. Beautiful!

It is a beautiful bird and very intelligent, majestic, mysterious and resourceful. I understand they live a very long life.

Having lived in Yellowknofe for 20 years, I came to appreciate the raven for its many songs, voice mimcry and strength of character and intelligence.
This bird is the soul of the north, a symbol of endurance and strength a worthy Canadian symbol!

The common raven is one of the most common birds found in northern Canada, year around! I think this poor old scavenger deserves a bit of well earned recognition!

The raven is highly intelligent and playful. It's wonderful to watch them interacting together.

The raven is indigenous to all parts of Canada, and is iconic in the ancestral lore of the Aboriginal people as the shaper of the world. Ravens were also part of the Norse mythology - Odin's two ravens, Huginn and Muninn, were considered to be the foundation of his wisdom - and the Norse were the first European settlers in North America, in L'Anse au Meadow, Newfoundland. Another tie, going back to our British heritage, are the Tower ravens in London, England.

The raven is not necessarily a noble bird, but they are loyal to family and clan, and are very intelligent. They have a complex language and an intricate life style, replete with specific behaviours and customs.

The raven would be a fitting representative for Canada because of its wide distribution, strong family values, and iconic image.

If you are going to have a national anthem that reads “true north strong and free” no bird em-spirits or em-bodies those qualities more than the raven. Also, the raven is very smart, very funny and playful, athletic, wide ranging, inquisitive, likes to figure things out, is happy to keep itself to itself but has a strong family group. The raven is, and historically has been, venerated by pretty well all aboriginal groups and it would do well that our national bird speaks to that knowledge and tradition. It is always a privilege to be in the company of a true raven. We should be honoured if Raven were to accept being our national bird.

Smart bird...gather together like all Canadians and enjoy the cold...

The raven, the most intelligent of birds, captures more than any other the great spirit of Canadian freedom, curiosity, inventiveness and gregariousness. With rich social connections amongst their own, ravens are also known to reach out beyond their own species to befriend other creatures, including humans. With its vast language abilities, resourcefulness to live in any and all Canadian climates, and unique ability to form mutually beneficial relationships with others, this bird is us.

Raven is a very intelligent that recognizes people and does a wonderful job of clean-up of messes left by humans.

the Raven is a symbol of wilderness,sagacious and adaptable,skilled as an aerial gymnast,many credit them with supernatural powers,traditionally pictured as a dour and somber bird.he sometimes seems to challenge hawks in the air, easily avoiding each pass, they show enough boldness to mob golden eagles and rout such fierce birds as gyrfalcons - in these encounters "corax " usually wins. (Common Raven / Corvus Corax)

The raven has proven itself over the past,distant and near,as being intelligent, self sufficient and extremely social. This bird has been known to have reasoning and cognisant powers of deduction to solve problems by itself and in a group. Being a large sized bird, it can as a group protect themselves, as well as fend of its enimies. I feel that the Raven shows how well we can learn from their behaviour to be as conscious about our country as one big community as they do in their group known as an unkindnesses. Please concider the raven as our national bird. Thank you.

This magnificent bird is found in every province and territory. It is hardy and lives a long life under harsh conditions. This should definitely be Canada's bird.

The raven is not only ubiquitous, it is extremely intelligent and adaptive. First Nations across Canada have many myths and legends about ravens.

This beautiful bird is an acrobatic flyer. Rich vocal capability, multilingual. Clever, curious, mischievous, playful. Loyal to Canada. Pairs mate for life. This bird embodies the spirit and culture that we humans aspire to.

I think the raven should be the chosen bird because of it's Aboriginal heritage, the fact that it is found throughout Canada and that it does not migrate.

THe raven is widespread throughout Canada and extremely intelligent.

I would like to vote for the Raven. They are very intelligent birds with many language calls - and thus multicultural! This bird is very important to the native peoples of British Columbia, and thus the Raven would be representative of them. In their mythology, the Raven takes our souls to heaven. Tamed Ravens can talk like human beings. We have a pair living on our property called Chaka and Zulu. They frequently come for walks with my dog Rupert and me, and we call to each other. The blue/black coat shines in the sun and the snow. In my view, they are representative of all the peoples of this country...and very Canadian.

very comical smart bird,love the different calls it makes

Everywhere one goes in our wonderful country, be it city or rural, there are ravens. They are seen on the sea coast where they are glossy from eating fish. They live in cities where they have adapted to eating human leftovers. They are present in First Nations legends. They are vocal mimics and sometimes, I wonder just what creature I am hearing, if indeed it is not a ghost. Intelligent and adaptable, I vote the raven as our national bird.

The smartest bird, and the best story of our nationhood from the millenniums on down

The Common Raven is the only bird that breeds in every province and territory of the country. It is also a year-round resident, enduring the winter hardship even in Nunavut. Its life is beautifully enmeshed with First Nations stories. It is a clever bird, a family bird, a magnificent bird. By adopting the raven as our national bird, we would definitively be original and creative and thoughtful of our history and natural heritage.

The raven is truly a bird of legends. Tales of the raven and its connection with man are woven into First Nations history and culture. Known for its incredible intelligence, resourcefulness and adaptability, the raven is a constant source of awe and amusement wherever it is found.

Canadians strongly identify with their wilderness and with the north, and the raven is strongly associated with these regions. This is a bird who becomes part of the soul of humans who inhabit or visit these regions of our country.

The Raven would be a strong stoic emblem of Canada. This bird is smart, intuitive and mythical in nature. It is has been revered by peoples worldwide for millennia.

I think that the raven should be our bird because it can still be found in the northern reaches of Canada.

The Common Raven is under-appreciated, much like Canadians. They are superb flyers, performing impressive rolls and twists and rival even the most adept birds of prey. They have an impressive array of vocalizations with a few colourful regional variations. They tolerate (but perhaps don't enjoy - like all Canadians) incredibly harsh conditions and are known to virtually all Canadians from the south to the far north. In some areas of the north, they are the only bird present in the winter. They give the pretext of working well in groups but research has showed that this is just a sneaky tactic to circumvent local territory owners. They have adapted well to populated areas of Canada and are increasing in these parts but still seem to prefer the wilderness and cottage country over cities - like most Canadians.

The Raven is a representative for every Province in Canada and is smart and resourceful.

This bird has with ties to the First Nations as The Trickster. I have a painting by aboriginal artist, Michael Robinson "Shadow of a Bird", which is a raven. They are family oriented, found all over Canada and don't leave when the going gets tough in the winter. (I'm from Georgia and I can identify with that.) Pretty, no. But funny and smart, yes. It's too easy to just go with another pretty face so let's go with the raven!

The raven is found all over the province and during all seasons.
And it is respected by the Natives in their Legends.
Besides, it cleans up the environment for us.

Is there anything more Canadian than a raven huddled on a street lamp, giving you the side-eye as you trundle past in your parka?

The Common Raven a bird who is anything but "common". A bird for all seasons, not one who flees winter. A bird for all provinces and territories. A bird historically powerful in both Aboriginal and Norse mythology but now comfortable in urban, rural and remote settings. A bird powerfully strong in body, mind and character, never weak, timid or showy. A bird of great intelligence ever ready to speak up in not one or two but many languages, unafraid to be known as "Trickster". A family bird who mates for life and actively defends its yound and territory. In short a truly Canadian Bird.

As unappealing as the Raven is to some people because it associated with some undesirable traits the Raven has many qualities that are similar to humans [both good and bad]. It also seems to one bird that is common to all regions of our vast country.

Cause my best friends nickname is Raven Claw

suka

I am voting for the raven because this bird is awsome

We need a national bird and i is the raven.Vote raven Vote raven!

representing the mighty Corvidae…in the blue trunks…Corvus corax The Common Raven. Dashing black tuxedo style at all times, intelligent beyond compare, melancholy calls unique to our northern forests, keystone ecological roles, widely distributed, resilient, sexy, cool, …need I say more?

Range across Canada; common/conspicuous in northern areas; very intelligent (among birds); adaptable; ties to First Nations culture.

I vote for the Raven because it symbolizes unity for All Canadians including our First Nations.

The raven is found everywhere in Canada. It doesn't leave in winter or the darkness of the Arctic days. They're smart, they laugh, they are resourceful, they're revered by aboriginal peoples. The Raven is Canada's national bird.

Bringer of the sun; coast to coast to coast you'll find them; dark of Arctic day; gossiping on the rooftops in Whitehorse; croaking in Northumberland County; flying low over an Atlantic beach; smart, chuckling, watching, glistening, ancient.

The common raven is anything but common - as one of the few species of birds indigenous to Canada which has a natural desire to play, I believe they embody the character of our great Nation gloriously. They are highly intelligent, curious, tough, beautiful, and they still love sliding down snow drifts and performing aerobatics simply for the joy of it. Doesn't that sound like the kind of Canadian you aspire to be?

It doesn't have to be the most beautiful, it doesn't have to be the most iconic - but it is, in a very real way, the most human. As a Canadian, that's where I rest my pride.

Regards,

Cynthia Nilsson

I love ravens. They are full-time residents of Canada -- no flying south to warmer climes in winter. To see a couple of ravens catching thermals just above your head, only to then dive bomb straight down a sheer precipice is a pure delight.

Ravens are swift, intelligent, and magical; with ties to Aboriginal roots, it is a great representation of Canada.

The common raven is found, year round, in virtually all of Canada. NO OTHER BIRD HAS THIS RANGE. It is a bird that appears in almost all First Nation's lore. The raven is also a VERY intelligent animal, is extremely social, and has a most remarkable sense of humour. The common raven MUST be Canada's national bird.

The national bird should be a bird that lives everywhere. Growing up in Saskatchewan, it felt strange that our national tree and symbol, the maple, was nowhere to be found in the prairies. It was impossible to identify with it because those plants don't grow all over Canada.

It's the same with birds. We need a bird that is ubiquitious and easily recognizable so that all Canadians can identify with it. Ravens are terribly smart and they stick around all winter; this is important as a Canadian symbol.

As well, I feel that we need to honour geographical Canada's cultural heritage, in that Raven was an immensely important animal/spirit for almost all First Nations. Many First Nations genesis stories involve Raven bringing light to the world or finding the people in a clam shell, i.e. being the most important bird.

A Canadian national bird should be non-migratory and reflect the qualities we wish to represent ourselves with. Owls are charismatic but not overly intelligent. Most raptors are migratory. But ravens are smart, extremely social, can self-recognize and by being generalists, opportunists and tool-users can survive the Canadian winter.

The Raven is an exceptionally intelligent creature that needs a healthy environment to survive. Its history as an Aboriginal creation myth figure would make it well suited to a bird representing our nation, as it would be a respectful nod to their, now our, cultural heritage.

Smart, adaptable, playful, many-voiced bird that has significance in Aboriginal stories.

What better bird to represent our country than the intelligent and resourceful Raven? Although not generally thought of as a "beautiful" bird, the raven, to me, epitomizes the rugged nature of our great land. It also has a very strong connection to our first nations population who have long revered the bird for the very qualities I've mentioned.

We see the raven wherever we go in Canada. It keeps road kill off the highways and cleans up garbage people leave around. It really is a majestic bird and enough isn't recognized about it. I really think it should be given a higher status than it is.

Still torn between the Raven and the Crow
Chose Raven because the risk of the Americans (Audubon) having high jacked the name of our crows
I love the Canadian Crow
But I choose the Raven

This is an obvious choice for such an intelligent bird who stays here all year round, and adds so much to the beauty and sound of our outdoors.

I have been making friends with a family of ravens for the last few years. No food involved just talking to them when I am outside. One of them is my buddy, he or she follows me around the yard as we talk together. I'm sure this bird is the one I watched learn to fly a number of years ago. I also had the honor of watching a mourning session as the murder grieved. I wanted to vote for the whiskey jack, but I think they are just cute little beggers that anyone who goes out in the woods has fun feeding.

VOTE RAVEN!

If the Canadian Geographic National Bird Project (http://www.canadiangeographic.ca/nationalbird/) is a popularity contest then I suspect that the Common Raven will not win. It is however the most deserving species.

This Raven’s resourcefulness, intelligence and geographic range speak to this. Does any other national bird candidate center its continental range to virtually the entire country? Many species are widespread but do they live here for the entire year? Or do they run for warmer climes when the mercury drops…

How many of the candidates can thrive, year-round, in habitats ranging from the treeless tundra to our urban centers? One might argue that the Canada Goose can but will you find a Canada Goose in the tundra in January?

And what about the graceful diver found on our one dollar coin? Many people wax poetic about the loon’s yodelling call but can that song be heard from December until ice-out? In winter, Canada’s definitive season, the only “loonies” found throughout most of the country are in our pockets.

But the Raven is here. Year round. It was here when our first peoples walked across the Bering Strait land bridge. They knew the Raven was special and they honored it in their mythology. So too did their old-world cousins, the Celts, Romans, Scandinavians and Siberian tribes to name a few.

The Raven is the best possible symbol of what we Canadians SHOULD be. Tough, resourceful and intelligent. Are these worthy national attributes? How about playful, graceful and strong? Ravens are all those things. VOTE RAVEN.

The alternative is to go with a species that runs from the cold or is found only in a part of the country. Is that the kind of Canadian you want to be? VOTE RAVEN — the truly Canadian bird.

The trickster.

I feel Canadians have a natural affinity for the common raven. These birds are confident, powerful, beautiful, intelligent, curious, playful, athletic and hardy. They are ever watchful. They persevere through all of our extreme weather and are here with us year round. They are guardians, and communicators like the modern Canadian. They also have a strong link and continue to have deep meaning for many of our aboriginal peoples. I am proud to be Canadian, and I would be proud to have the raven as our national bird.

The Raven is such a clever, beautiful bird - whenever I'm lucky enough to see one, I have to stop and admire this bird. Its loud chattering always makes me smile!

Has to be the Raven - one of the few birds found coast to coast to coast. Smart and Tough. The only creature that is found in an arctic winter and is black, not white!

The Common Raven is anything but common. The top of the Corvid Family is intelligent, resourceful and a survivor, against some very taxing odds. They are loyal, mischevious, and absolutely beautiful. They are found in every part of Canada, somewhere.
Why wouldn't we want a bird like this for our National Bird?!

they are dope! smartest birds ever.

Ravens are really smart birds. They nest in the spruce tree beside my house. When I put out food for them, they politely take it away, and they don't leave a mess behind. Sometimes, they are noisy, especially when the babies are young, but I don't mind. They keep the pigeons and seagulls away from my house. I like it when I come home, or when I come out of my house, and they are there and caw to me.

Nationally distributed and culturally linked across the country for sea tp sea to sea. Always wonder what they are saying to each other as they fly over -- begging a human connection.

I am voting for the Common Raven because this bird stays in Canada all year long, is a mate for life, and is extremely intelligent. After reading the other comments, I am smitten by this clever bird. I love the Raven's place in Canadian lore and aboriginal stories. I see Ravens all the time outside my window. I will look at them through different eyes now that I've learned a bit about them. This is the perfect bird to represent Canada!

To me this bird is intelligent because they are able to find food, and if they find any food, they invite all species, such as other birds and other animals in the Canadian animal kingdom to join them but making their call of finding to the wild.

I am voting for the Raven because this bird lives with us year round, is loyal to its mate and is highly intelligent. The raven can be playful and acrobatic in flight and is a joy to watch.

The Raven also figures significantly in First Nations mythology.

My country is winter
Raven stays through the winter
From coast to coast to coast
living cooperatively and socially
Raven is our bird.

The raven is smart, it does not migrate and thrives in the winter, it is associated with the north, it is very prominant in First Nation's culture and mythogies, it's big and strong and it is found in all provinces and territories.

Canada wide and means a lot to Frist Nation peoples

I, too, think raven would be a most fitting choice as our Canadian National Bird and a testament to our First Nations Peoples culture and the wonderful stories they have shared with us about raven "the trickster". To observe raven's pure joy in Mother Nature's playground is sublime.

There is no doubt that the Raven must be our national bird, for all the reasons that have been described, so eloquently by it's supporters.

The raven is a highly intelligent bird that stays in Canada, rain or shine, winter and summer. It's no snow bird, flapping south each winter. It stays around and toughs it out. It also has a huge fan base. I have several crow mugs, photos, etc. Ravens Rock!

The Raven is a year round resident in every province and territory in Canada as well as the far north. It is a very intelligent bird and would be a great symbol for Canada.

We watch the Raven in action every day. He is a very smart bird. We watch the Raven from our window stashing the food as he collects it. He must have some radar system as he can find it when needed exactly where he hid it. As we walk round the lake on our walk, the Raven calls and seems to talk to us. I have learned to talk back to him by using a raucous voice.

The raven lives in every province and territory, is arguably the smartest bird in the country, and is central (likely for the above reasons) to First Nations' culture. While the loon has a beautiful voice and the sound of it immediately brings a quiet, northern lake to mind - and that may be where you are when you hear it - we've already given this fowl our dollar. Let's spread the wealth around.
The raven has a hundred voices and many are as haunting as the loon's call. Who can forget the silence of a forest broken by what sounds like a Inuit throat singer. I'd also argue that the true 'caw,' something I also associate with a northern spruce forest, belongs to the raven and not the crow (more commonly a part of a murderous cacophony).
I live in a rural area and occasionally see a loon. I see and hear the ravens that live nearby far more frequently. They are more a part of our lives, a connection to the natural world. If you spend time around them you know they are watching us at least as often as we watch them. We have heard the raven call our names.
They exude a wisdom they may not possess but we do know that they are the brains of the bird world. Heck, ravens probably know that the loon is their main competition for Canada's national bird and they are no doubt puzzled that we could be considering a good looking singer who spends his days fishing. Let's celebrate and glorify intelligence. Let's vote for the bird associated with the creation of the earth itself and hanging the sun, moon and the stars in the sky. The raven can handle the responsibility of being Canada's national bird whereas the loon would likely duck out to the lake to sing another song.

They're across Canada, intelligent, smart, family orientated, fascinating, taken for granted and/or ignored - not "on your face" and part of aboriginal culture (although I'm not) - the most Canadian bird i can think of. Artists put them in their work (e.g. Ted Harrison), and they're big and can outdo the bald eagle.

The Common Raven is a Canadian marvel. This smart bird is fully adapted to living and prospering in Canada, being found in all provinces and territories, year-round. How many other birds have this claim to fame? Most are seasonal, and are often only noticed when in seasonal plumage (usually just the males)or on seasonal migrations abroad. Unlike just about every other bird, the Raven is honoured in the stories and clan structures of many societies and cultures across Canada, a testament to its relationship with humankind. Again, how many other wild birds have relationships with Canadians, relationships which are based on respect, admiration and equality as beings making their homes and raising their families in this country? "Common" can have a derogatory meaning, implying low class, uninspiring, not noteworthy, but the Common Raven is anything but. As noted above, it is an outstanding bird, and like us, is commonly found throughout Canada and throughout the year.

Being an avid outdoor's woman, going for my daily walk is a regular routine that I enjoy. Every single day, whether, Summer, Autumn, Winter, Spring, I always see two Raven on my Northern Ontario property. Some days, more than two, four or six have seen here. With the quietness of the area in my yard, I can pause and just listen to nothing, then all of a sudden the sound of the Ravens are heard. Not only do I observe them, but I'm entertained by their calling. Two Ravens have even made their home in one of the older buildings in the back on my property. They are easily spooked though, when I approached their home, they quickly fly away, startling me often. But, I can honestly say, that these Ravens are daily visitors and two of them are permanent residents in my yard. Because of having a bird feeder in my front yard, I'm able to observe these two Ravens often eating from this feeder. Having scraps from my kitchen, I regularly scatter this food on the ground for them. Their eye sight are amazing, because in no time at all, these birds see the food that is scattered and come immediately to get it. They do their share of scattering the bones, left from the food, since I noticed the bones in different sections of my 14 acre property. Throughout the years, I've taken many pictures of these beautiful, black birds living in my yard. What a sight they are, their black bodies against the white snow, or by the green color of the Red Pine or Poplar trees. No matter where these Ravens are situated, they are a marvelous sight to behold, for my daily enjoyment. So yes, I really think that the Raven are a persistent, tough and beautiful bird for our Canadian country. A definite tenant of this gorgeous land of ours, Canada.

Being an avid outdoor's woman, going for my daily walk is a regular routine that I enjoy. Every single day, whether, Summer, Autumn, Winter, Spring, I always see two Raven on my Northern Ontario property. Some days, more than two, four or six have seen here. With the quietness of the area in my yard, I can pause and just listen to nothing, then all of a sudden the sound of the Ravens are heard. Not only do I observe them, but I'm entertained by their calling. Two Ravens have even made their home in one of the older buildings in the back on my property. They are easily spooked though, when I approached their home, they quickly fly away, startling me often. But, I can honestly say, that these Ravens are daily visitors and two of them are permanent residents in my yard. Because of having a bird feeder in my front yard, I'm able to observe these two Ravens often eating from this feeder. Having scraps from my kitchen, I regularly scatter this food on the ground for them. Their eye sight are amazing, because in no time at all, these birds see the food that is scattered and come immediately to get it. They do their share of scattering the bones, left from the food, since I noticed the bones in different sections of my 14 acre property. Throughout the years, I've taken many pictures of these beautiful, black birds living in my yard. What a sight they are, their black bodies against the white snow, or by the green color of the Red Pine or Poplar trees. No matter where these Ravens are situated, they are a marvelous sight to behold, for my daily enjoyment. So yes, I really think that the Raven are a persistent, tough and beautiful bird for our Canadian country. A definite tenant of this gorgeous land of ours, Canada.

Representative of Canada's north and has a strong first nations connection. Playful and knowledgeable.

My vote is for the common Raven. While there are many many birds that could represent Canada proudly I feel that the Raven with all of it's attributes of being steadfast and proud and also having the initiative to make it's home all across Canada is one that to me says "I am a Canadian bird". It lives in cold to moderate climates from sea to sea and appears in most of our First Nations lore. It is sleek but with a solid neck that means determination and strength.
Thank you

Smart with an amazing vocal range - although I would not call a Raven a song bird. They are inquisitive and will remember you. They mimic all kinds of sounds and have large extended families. They share the same pre-cambrian brain as us humans and have great empathy for their kind. Ravens are steeped in First Nations lore - They are creators, tricksters and they are cunning opportunists. Ravens have much to teach us.
I love ravens...

Given the extensive year-round habitat of this bird throughout our country, it deserves this honour over the other birds who cover a smaller area, and who are not year-round inhabitants of most of our land mass. This bird is also probably the most intelligent of the group, and is a major player in our indigenous peoples' lore. Unlike the Canada Goose, our raven is not usually considered a messy pest, and is delight to watch.

Once a bird-lover, always a bird-lover; doesn't matter. My choice would be a bird that falls out of the 'favourite' categories, as Canadians we're not prone to select something that rebels against the rules of good manners, etc. These birds are amazing, clever individuals who follow their own path in life and are certainly Canadian. One post indicated the 'whiskey jack' wasn't on the list; otherwise known as the Canadian Grey Jay. And, yes, we have ravens in southern Saskatchewan, I watch them post guards while the partner goes through the dumpster. Their language is what intrigues me, I could listen to them all day and wonder what it all means. What bird is more handsome than a raven?

This is my personal favourite bird...they are so intelligent.

The Raven is quietly persistent, unlike the Canada Goose for example and id one of our most intelligent birds - unlike many of your other candidates and their choices.

Unlike the crow, the raven is a shy bird. They like to gather in small groups and are instrumental in cleaning up road kill. Their calls are varied and they do respond when I practice my own cawing. They have another, higher pitched call, that is is used for communication at long distances.
They were highly prized by our First Nations Peoples, bleing carved onto totem poles, canoe prows, etc.
they are gorgeous to look at and very interesting to observe.

Non-migratory ( definitely not a snow-bird ) and smart. It has the qualities that prompted west-coast indigenous people to carve it as a totem.

As well as being intelligent and resourceful, the Raven can be a real entertainer with an amazing repertoire of calls and aerobatic flights. The Raven is present in part or all of every province and territory of the country and he stays year round rather than disappearing for six months of the year. There is also a strong connection to Native culture and art.

I vote for the Common Raven. It lives where I live in Northern Ontario and stays here all year round. It is a large, beautiful and graceful bird with a great deal of intelligence and wariness.

Nevermore!

The Raven is a clean up artist, he never migrates. Ravens are constantly cleaning up, whether its dead debre or others carbage. Ravens are intelligent, tuff, ignore the cold and are known to most. I realize Ravens are not the most beautiful, but, strong like Canadians. He is seen in cold conditions -40 or greater flying, soring, and constantly on the alert. They protect their young with vigar, and stay with them unitl they leave the nest.

This bird is part of the first nations culture and as such deserve a special status. It is a very intelligent bird and stately in its demeanour.

Personnally I would like the "moineau" but it is not a native, an emigrant like my ancestors from France. Could I be considered a native?

The Raven is an imposing beautiful bird. It is both intelligent and elegant. When you cast your eyes on one you know there is a story there, Full of mystery and intrigue. It can be found all over Canada in the mountains on the prairies and along the coasts. They live where we live, they are rural suburban and urban. It's unmistakable call lets you know it is there. A common and important symbol in folklore and aboriginal culture. There may be other obvious choices for some but this is the bird for me.

The Raven can be found in most parts of Canada. It has high intelligence with the ability to recognize individual people. It's vocabulary is extensive
It figures large in Native mythology and culture where it is called the "Trickster" It is easily recognized by most Canadians. It is one of the few birds that appears to have fun in it' s life.

I believe the raven should be our national bird. Smart, mischievous, a strong acrobatic flier and powerful long-time aboriginal symbol across many cultures, this bird personifies Canada and by extension, Canadians. It is a thinking bird. The raven is able to encounter a problem, analyze it, develop a solution and solve the problem, usually in short order. The raven has patience and skill. It is omnivorous - it will do what it needs to do to survive. It is adaptable to many conditions and environments. It tolerates others. It is playful. It is seldom aggressive but will defend itself. It is the perfect Canadian avian symbol.

They are my favourite bird because they are very intelligent and very resourceful.

The Raven has been a significant symbol for the first peoples of Canada. It is a resident bird that stays here all year, unlike those treacherous migrants who abandon Canada when the going gets tough. It is not only tough but playful. Watching a trio of ravens play tag brings joy to ones heart. It is the sound of the north woods.

They always make me chuckle, they watch us and observe more than we know, the ones at lake Louise pull their feathers down over their feet and saunter around like they own the place, they do!

The raven is a great candidate for Canada's national bird. Ravens are extremely intelligent, they use a wide range of vocalizations to communicate with each other, they demonstrate teamwork, they are playful, are superb fliers and they mate for life. They are among the few species found everywhere in Canada in all seasons.

Intelligent, playful, watchful. A witty bird. But not a show-off. Seen but not heard. Heard but not seen. Making an appearance or sounding off when necessary, but no more than necessary. Then going off on its own to do what ever ravens do, which is none of our business really.

The raven is a strong contender, with deep cultural-mythical roots among both the First Nations peoples and the peoples of Northern Europe. Its intelligence is also well established.

resident year round in every province and territory. very intelligent bird. Influence in aboriginal culture before the caucasian explorers and settlers came to the continent.

Ravens are the undisputed champions of the north, circumpolar in distribution and lords of the Boreal forest. Nature's ultimate opportunist has evolved "play" equal to man's. His heralded calls personify the Canadian North. Clearly the right choice.
Mike Waddell

Un de nos oiseaux les plus intelligents aussi symbole important de nos premières nations.

my office is on the 7th floor on the university of alberta campus, facing east. When the weather gets wild with strong winds and driven snow, a family of ravens celebrates with barrel rolls and chases outside the window...

we get large groups forming circling 'kettle', end of day, end of winter, then daily they head to a roost somewhere northwest of campus (in Edmonton, AB).

I choose the Raven because it is highly intelligent, curious, strong, a problem solver, can be found all over Canada, and most importantly I think, stays in Canada all year round. Most of the birds on this list are not found throughout Canada in ever season. The Raven most certainly is!

An intelligent bird with scavenging capabilities and range throughout Canada. Their voice is difficult to mimic.

Ravens are intelligent and social. They play a major role in Aboriginal mythology. They are fascinating to watch, even if they are just picking throug a trash pile.

The Common Raven is probably the only bird occurring commonly in all Canadian jurisdictions.

Because it relates to native heritage

The Raven is a bird that stays in Canada all year round. The legends of Raven tell us he brought light to the universe where there was only darkness. The Raven is very intelligent, playful, and protects the family. This bird is adaptable to it's environment whether it is on the coast, the woods, prairies, the artic or the cities. I choose the Raven, otherwise the Raven may be over looked because it seems to get a negative view.

I like the fact that ravens live in all provinces and territories across Canada, are very smart birds and also have a strong connection to First Nations.

I support the raven because it was honoured by Canada's first people.

I picked the raven because they are one of the smartest species of birds that i know of,i always loved them and always will.They are very brave and never afraid.I read that they have the same intelligence as a 7 year old so that makes them a smart choice!!

the raven is associated with Canada and .First Nation Culture. The Raven is extremely intelligent and creative being able to adapt to The varied geographic habitats within Canada. It is well known and easily identified by most people. The playful nature of ravens and their continued exploration of new territories and environments reflects the way Canadians a new Canadians explore and adapt to this vast country.

-29c cold January morning, a big black bird flew over the road and I knew by then that the raven is and will be Canadian for sure as It one of the rare bird to stick around with us to live through the Canadian winter

Raven is the smartest bird with the most personality and lives everywhere in Canada.

This vote should be conducted using a preferential ballot. The single preference vote that you are offering, like First Past the Post, is fatally flawed when there are more than two options. For instance, in my case I prefer the raven. If I vote for the raven then I have no opportunity to show a preference between the leaders, the loon and the snowy owl. This is not fair. You could be performing a valuable service to Canadian society by introducing Canadians to the use of a preferential ballot. Only a small change to the presentation of the web site wouldm be needed. The programming in the background would be more of a challenge but I would be pleased to help you with that.

Ubiquitous and speaks for us all

Le grand corbeau est présent dans tous les provinces et territoires du Canada. dans les croyances des premières nations il avait une place très importante dans leurs croyance et leurs tradition , c'est le grand conteur et surtout probablement le plus intelligent de tous les oiseaux du Canada. Le Arfand des neige est l'emblème du Québec donc je ne vois pas l'utilité d'avoir le même oiseau pour emblème. Le grand corbeau est aussi présent a toutes les saisons. Pour moi c'est l'oiseau idéal pour servir d'emblème a tous les Canadiens

I am torn between the Raven and the Common Loon. Nothing is more evocative than the call of the Loon soaring across the water. It is a beautiful bird found throughout most of Canada. And it is of course already emblazened on the Loonie.

But there is a reason that First Nations made the Raven the central figure in so many stories. Ravens are clever, mischievous, gregarious, intelligent and ubiquitous, outside of urban cores. No bird has a longer history of human contact. No bird is more clever. So far as I know, no other Canadian bird regularly uses tools. No bird has anything like the huge vocabulary of the Raven, some elements of which are almost as evocative as the Loon's plaintive call (I am thinking of the knocking or drumming call). No bird has such a sense of humor.

Do we want a symbol evoking remote beauty or one that embodies intelligence, humor, sociability, and ambiguity. I am going with the latter.

The raven is the bird that best represents the qualities that Canadians admire and strive for:
Intelligence: The raven is the smartest bird of all.
Co-operation: The raven works with Inuit hunters and others.
Survival: The raven can and does survive in all sorts of environments.
Communication and Humour: Is there any bird funnier than the raven- a true trickster?
Heritage: The raven connects us with our first peoples and their cultures.
The raven should definitely be Canada's bird.

I have often spent time watching these curious birds and am amazed by their antics. Their species is steeped in our history and oft mentioned by many of Canada's authors.

The raven is a great choice for a national bird - they are smart, curious, playful, and are found all over the woods of Canada.

Canadian Geographic

I grew with ravens as a child in Nova Scotia but didn't think about them (or many other parts of the natural world) until drifting into working with Indigenous peoples in Labrador in the 1970s and '80s. There, after I stopped drifting, I was introduced to many nuanced ideas of the natural world, as well as both eloquent and awkward functioning realities.
Since then I have been visited by ravens across the country, most evocatively for me while walking on the tundra of the Kitikmeot region of the Arctic, exploring Mayne Island of BC's Gulf Islands, while limping near Skidegate and Tow Hill in Haida Gwaii, on retreat to a hillside near Banff, all across the Great Plains, most especially along the rivers of Norway House and in the Qu'Appelle Valley and Cypress Hills, and while watching them play the winds for acrobatic routes over the Lake of the Woods. I'm now walking less and so have found ways to watch ravens from my nest-high perch beside Winnipeg's Assiniboine River. I have never doubted their awareness of my presence, nor do I now.
Ravens have sometimes loudly challenged, while at other times have clucked support and acceptance, and have always been there when needed, which has gradually become a constant.
A couple of decades ago, I decided to adopt myself to Raven Clan, without their knowledge or approval. Only ravens can reject this membership, and so far so good.

An intelligent bird most of Canada years round. It has character and special meaning for most of Canada's indigenous people as well. While many National birds ed are mainly predators the raven assists in keeping the Nation clean how ever can become a predator if necessary showing its versatility and its strength.

ravens are everywhere in Canada, they are smart, everyone sees them, do not migrate to other countries.

I live in southern Saskatchewan, near the Qu'Appelle Valley, 30 miles north of Regina. My Great Grandparents immigrated here, more than 100 years after their ancestors immigrated to the Maritimes from Scotland in 1771. My Great Grandparents homesteaded here, building a sod house on this same land that I now live on, in 1884. In their writings that they left their descendants they mentioned the Raven several times. For many years the Raven was absent from the plains of western Canada. It has returned now, in great numbers, due, no doubt, to depopulation of the rural countryside, change in agricultural practices, and likely changing climate conditions.

I nominate the Raven as Canada's National Bird for many reasons, including, but not limited to: its intelligence its resourcefulness, making do with whatever it is able to find (as the homesteaders had to do) its "work ethic" (so to speak) its unobtrusiveness, except when required to make its presence known and its place of great respect in aboriginal culture.

The raven is also a protector and will align with good people over bad.

The common raven is an obvious choice for a national bird of Canada: found in every province an territory, equally urban, rural and wilderness, importantly as opposed to some of the other options wintering here, rather than fleeing south, revered in mythology and quite clever as well.

Ravens are the most common bird that stands out in my area and they are super intelligent (supposedly)

Capacité à s'adapter à différents environnement. Présence à longueur d'année.Oiseau emblématique des Premières Nations.

A clever, beautiful trickster, the raven is always surprising us. One of the things I love is the sound of its wings overhead as I am gardening.

The raven is always here cleans up after us reminds us to recycle properly. Is the jokester of native mythology. Is strong and free.

The intelligence of the raven, together with its ubiquity in Canada and its symbolic value, particularly in association with Native Peoples, make it a perfect candidate for Canada's official bird. And unlike some other possible birds, it has no status as a provincial representative.

In the wise words of a friend: "My fellow Canadians, I urge you to vote for the common raven. It is resourceful and intelligent. It lives in every nook and cranny of this great country of ours. It's a year-round resident. It's significant for most First Nations. What more could you ask of a national bird?"

I grew up in the NWT and the raven was the year around bird that at the same time was both clown, and brilliant. Watching the raven bait the dogs was always enjoyable. The birds were fascinating to watch as they played in they played in the air.

It lives everywhere in Canada, and it's a year-round resident. It's intelligent and resourceful. Perhaps most important, it is significant for most First Nations in Canada.

Its call brings the forests into being, intelligent, playful, majestic

The Raven is a beautiful & very intelligent bird. It in fond almost everywhere in Canada ( I think). I choose this bird because it is so important to First Nations people & appears in many of their1our tribal & clan drawings & legends.

I have not written an essay since I was a kid in school 30 years ago (so please forgive my grammar) but I just had to write about my choice for national bird, so here goes...

Many kinds of birds appeal to me at different times of the year. Who doesn't love the call of the Loon, hoot of an Owl, the cheery chirps of the Thrush, the song of Warblers an you walk through the woods? How difficult to choose only one bird.
We live on a large rural farm/woodland, and some of my favorite neighbors are Common Ravens. Out here, Ravens are abundant, but they are anything but "common".
Ravens are found all over Canada, anytime of the year. They have a very obvious intelligence, inquisitive and playful personality no other bird in Canada can match.
The regal, dark, glossy plumage and obvious joy they have in flight, the way they have adapted to the ever spreading incursions of mankind, makes the Raven unique among the many wonderful birds of Canada.
And how much fun Ravens are to observe...though who is watching who can be debatable. You can be in a busy parking lot in the middle of a city, or just arrive to camp in an isolated spot of the pristine wilderness, and the Raven will quickly arrive to check you out.
Whether you are watching Ravens in flight practice barrel rolls just for fun, or teasing your dog as they steal kibble from the food dish, you know there is a very keen intelligence behind those dark little eyes and it seem to me, a bit of naughty humor.
The Raven knows how to open the chip bag you just set on the picnic table. He knows the burger you set on the fender of the truck at work (while you turned away to foolishly answer the cell) must be opened quietly, so the meat can be hauled away before you notice...he will return later for the toppings and maybe a few buddies to help him. Have you watched Ravens hard-shelled nuts on the road, to get the passing cars to crack them open? They are just amazingly brilliant and fun!
The Raven's array of vocalizations gronks-as he flies over your backyard to inspect the compost, the familiar caws-calling his family to a feast of entrails left by a hunter, and the beautiful, hard to describe, trills-made during spring courtship flights, just to mention a few. You can hear those calls from the most remote wilderness to the busiest city. I think that kind of presence makes him a perfect candidate for national bird.
The Raven fills an important niche in the ecosystem with his omnivorous habits. Often viewed as a pest, he is really more of an opportunist. He'll take the easy found food, hunt his own, or puzzle out how to open more unusual treats like nuts or shellfish. Hopefully his adaptability to his surroundings will enable his survival long after humans are gone.
I think the Raven has had a certain kinship to mankind since man first began to intrude into his world. From the creation stories of Canadian First Nations, to the tales and fables that we later arrivals brought from the "old country", the Raven has often had a lead role, probably because we see similar behaviour in ourselves-the good and the bad. Many of those old tales remind us to laugh at ourselves, not to take ourselves too seriously, that we should be thankful for the good things in life, and that greed will make you sorry in the end.
In America, Benjamin Franklin thought the Wild Turkey was a better representative than the Bald Eagle for their national bird, and thinking of those birds' attributes, I have to agree.
We have the opportunity now to choose a bird that similarly, may not be rare, or considered majestic, like many others. A bird that represents adaptability, survival, and being one with wherever you live, from coast to coast, year round. Just like Canadians.
I think the Raven deserves our respect and should be our National Bird. Hopefully, more people will recognize the interesting characteristics of this bird, and be proud of our not-so-common, "Common Raven".

A family of ravens visit our platform bird feeder on a daily basic.

Common Ravens are strong, resilient, intelligent, historically important and revered, and live in all parts of Canada. An excellent choice!

i believe the common raven should be Canada's national bird. They are extremely intelligent, enjoy interacting with humans and are opportunistic creatures. They are omnivores and mate for life! A very good fit with the homo sapien!

As far as appearances and personalities are concerned they are very majestic looking, good negotiators with humans for food and seem to be able to adapt magnificently to their surroundings.

The Common Raven:

I chose the Common Raven for various reasons. First and foremost, it symbolizes creation, knowledge, prestige, as well as the complexity of nature and the subtlety of truth. It also symbolizes the unknown, and is there to show that every person sees the world in a different way as another. It plays a prominent roll in aboriginal culture and can often be found on hand carved totem poles throughout Canada.

Also, the Common Raven is our largest songbird. It is very bold, highly intelligent, and uses logic to solve problems, or puzzles designed specifically to test or trick them. The habitat of the Common Raven encompasses the entirety of Canada from coast, to coast, to coast, making it an ideal choice as the bird to represent "all" of Canada.

Never realized what a beautiful bird the common raven was until one year out West in B.C. for some unknown reason it captured my attention and now at home in Quebec I watch and listen to them a whole lot more.

The Raven lives year round everywhere in Canada, even in the High Arctic. It is one tough bird, and can live on dump pickings if need be. I want my national bird to be smart, hardy and pan- Canadian. And in my home province of BC the Raven is the trickster to First Nations people. Vote Raven!

The Raven makes no compromise, either by turning white in winter, or migrating to warmer climes. It is found in all parts of the country, especially where there is little human occupation. The Raven enjoys flying and aerobatics, including mid-air copulation. This is really the best choice for our national bird.

My vote for the raven was easy as it is by far one of the most intelligent birds. Besides their large vocabulary, they also have the ability to recognize people and remember last interactions, both positive and negative. A number of years ago we held off having a tree infested with Pine beetles taken down as there was a nest with babies in it. Once they left the nest, it came down.
Fortunately for us, the mating pair, moved to a large tree across the street and would come to our yard when we were out. We gave them treats when they came and before long had developed a trusting relationship.
As we started observing their habits, such as burying extra food in caches and listening to their different vocalization patterns we also read research to learn. more.

For the 5 years we lived there, they brought every new set of offspring over to meet us once they were able to leave the nest. Snack budget went up a fair bit, but the joy we got from interacting with them was well worth is.

My highlight was when a baby not quite ready to fly fell out of a nest and the only person they didn't try to attack when they approached him was me. They allowed me to pick him up and place him on a branch in a tree in our yard, where they came and looked after him for the evening and then were able to eventually get him back to the nest. Two weeks later they brought him and his two siblings over to us for lunch and another summer was begun.

When we moved to the Northwest Coast, leaving them behind was very hard, but by then other neighbours were starting to care for them as well.
In our new home we're blessed with many variety of birds, particularly Ravens and Eagles, but with the abundance of food available, the ravens haven't become regular visitors to our yard. Still we continue to learn more and gain greater respect for these remarkable birds.

I fly on the blackest of wings
I soar through the Dark night sky
I answer no call but my own
I alone forge my reality
For I am the Raven
Child of Odin

The Raven is Canada's bird. I have seen this bird in every one of biome within our great country. This survivor thrives at the top of mountains, the middle of prairie, on the oceans shore and within downtown high rise building. This trickster from many aboriginal stories deserves our greatest respect and I would be proud to have ravens as a symbol of canadian strength, intelligence, resiliency and family orientation.

The raven. Le Grand Corbeau. An unmistakable denizen of the Rocky Mountains. Large, 53 cm lengthwise, and completely black. Not to be confused with his cousin the American crow, who leaves this country before winter's chill sets in. The raven remains to keep us company through a long cold winter. He sits on signs in the morning sunlight talking to us with a "rawk" or a "tock" as if to say "c'est ne pas un pays, c'est l'hiver." It's no wonder First Nations peoples thought of the raven as their brother.

There are so many wonderful birds to choose from, but I chose the Raven as a possibility for our national bird, because it is one of very few listed who stays with us all year round, including way up North.
It is also felt to be, to many First Nations people, a bringer of Magic, a messenger, who can help us to seek answers and allow us to experience a change of consciousness and the possibility of an awakening and growth.
As a national bird, wise and creative and magical, I feel it would give us many good things to think about, strive for and live up to.
(I found the information about "Raven" in "Medicine Cards - The Discovery of Power Through The ways of Animals", and felt it to be very fitting for us as a nation.)

Je crois que le Corbeau, à cause de sa signification dans la culture amérindienne, devrait être l'oiseau du Canada.

A bird found from coast to coast to coast. Admired both in aboriginal lore and contemporary society as it earns admiration for its determination, adaptibility and ingenuity.

The Common Raven is a very intelligent bird. Classified as a song bird I find their calls wonderful to listen to, even the young ones when learning. Each day I see them heading off from the nesting grounds at sunrise and return just before dusk. When returning they call out to greet those who stayed back for the day. To see them preparing their nests in January and nesting in February amazes me of the harsh life they lead. They are excellent scavengers and opportunists. Although they know what a green garbage bag may hold it's not their fault humans a lazy.
A national bird should be one that does not migrate from Canada. For a bird that has such a long long life span this is something to be admired.

The Raven lives here all year round ... enjoys all aspects of the Canadian weather. It is a very intelligent bird. I love to watch them as they soar above, surveying the landscape below.

A national bird for Canada must be a bird that can be found in the wild throughout this country, in all the provinces and territories, in all ecosystems, from the Pacific to the Atlantic and to furthest northern reaches of the arctic, from prairies, to forests, to mountain tops, happily and comfortably eking out an existence through all four seasons, surviving even through the months of winter darkness in the arctic, based on its ingenuity, intelligence, skill, and teamwork. Based on this there is only one qualified candidate: The Common Raven.

Many years ago I was working to protect spawning fish in the bush north of Hwy 11 in north central Ontario. I was there by myself for a whole day and was immensely entertained by the antics of a pair of ravens as they talked to each other and flew back and forth, diving and climbing, sometimes flying inverted. They really are fascinating creatures.

How could we not have a national symbol which stays year round and endures the harshness of winter by our side? They stay year round and are coast to coast. No doubt the brightest of the birds and display the ingenuity which distinguishes us as very Canadian.

Saved 2 ravens when i was a kid, kept them in a cage for a week and fed them, I liked em.

:> A raven's voice sounds like a pebble thrown into water... kloo glook... well something like that... :> I love hearing them fly overhead. I find them beautiful. Some are snowy white, they are not albinos. >: We have a couple on Vancouver Island. Ravens love life, they play! :> They are tough, smart and use tools and are simply just too cool. Also, they live everywhere in Canada, unlike many of the choices proposed.

The common Raven in the bird of my ancestors, The Tlingit people of Northern B.C. The raven is both wise and a prankster in native folklore, combining playfulness with intelligence throughout many of the legends, such as the one where Raven stole the light, illuminating the world with the sun, moon and stars. Ravens are social creatures that can use tools and can even imitate human voices. Though they are not a bird with glamorous feathers or pretty songs, the Raven is a true bird of Canada adaptable, clever and brave.

They fascinate me. Sometimes I feel as though they are studying me when I walk by them.
I think that the connection to First Nations and how they are revered is magical.

I'm going to pitch the noble raven. It has the most diverse birdsong of any bird which reflects our multiculturalism. They're not predators and don't habitually kill unless provoked. They're beautiful and one of the most intelligent of the avians. Yellowknife had to implement bear-proof garbage bins not because of bears, but for the ravens. They're both independent and social. They're strong, hardy and can be found everywhere in Canada from the high arctic to the urbanity of the Toronto.

The raven has single-handedly been attributed to the defense and success of the British Empire since 1066 AD and guards the realm from the Tower of London.

Much of the world's cultures worshiped the Corvus as a god at one time or another.

And Corvus just sounds way too cool, especially when alliterated with 'Canadian'.

It's fiercely loyal. If a member of a pair is lost, its mate reproduces the calls of its lost partner to call it back from death and encourage its return. . It can mimic human voice and speech.

A raven will willingly share its food with other ravens.

They eat the eggs of Bald Eagles.  

Three words... Edgar Allen Poe

Ive had numerous experiences with this most intelligent bird, and understand why they are revered by coastal aboriginal cultures. In the Central Coast of BC there was one raven who warned about rain. The raven would come up the valley about 5 or 10 minutes before the rain and caw and speak to me before changing direction and heading up to the next farm or homestead. Sure enough the rains would come after the bird had left. This happened pretty consistently so it was not chance. It is possible that these were different birds but if they were sharing the job that makes the story even more interesting.

Because it is the creator of the World for First Nation people, they are very intelligent creatures, have great communal skills, eveyone takes care of everyone even if it seems to be wandering or be alone. They have great survival skills, it is probably the only bird to mourn the death of a fellow raven, have their own communal funeral ritual. They have a very good memory an they are able to pass learned new skills to their young. It is wild but yet a well adapted urbanite. They are sble to make tools. That in all resumes what is to be a canadian.

plays such a important role in Native Culture and is very smart bird

The raven lives virtually everywhere in Canada. There are even a few of them here in Regina, though how/why they flew across the open plain is a mystery (that not being their natural habitat).

They are very competitive, fierce when challenged, and stay at home even on long, cold winter nights they are very hardy, and they are probably the most intelligent, certainly amongst the most intelligent, avians on the planet.

If that doesn't describe Canadians, I do not know what does.

PS, raven is a songbird?!! I would never have guessed.

The raven is the trickiest, smartest bird around, complete with luscious blue-black wings and an uncanny ability to mimic sounds of humans, machines and dogs - and Canada would do well to choose a bird that has a sense of humour.

Essay? Hmmm...
Well, the raven is, of course, the most intelligent of birds. Surely this is the ultimate qualification. I once saw perhaps 12 ravens playing with a stick. We were on the edge of a cliff perhaps 400 in the air. One raven would take the stick perhaps 200 feet above where we all watched. Then he or she would let it fall from her grasp and the others would take turns swooping in and tumbling end over end with the stick as it fell past us toward the floor of the canyon. Just as they got close to the ground, one raven would take the stick back up hundreds of feet above to then it again. The fun went on for perhaps an hour, those great birds tumbling past, swooshes of black feathers, engaged in a primeval Quiddich game invented before men ever invented anything. And how might a loon follow that?

Lives here,eats here,makes his home here,raises the family here.They are smart good looking and have a sense of humour.Great bird for a great country.

Beautiful, intelligent birds.

I once had a job doing water testing and would frequent a spot near a landfill. Every visit there, I would listen to 15-30 ravens chatter and talk. They made sounds mimicking dogs, cats, other birds, machines, human voices, and even a bear growl. It's a pretty unreal, and even a bit eerie walking through 60 ft evergreen trees filled with these huge beautiful birds all meowing like cats.

Ravens have been known to pass information between generations, remember faces, work in pairs for hunting, and can mimic sounds. How many other birds are this smart, so iconic, have this much lore (the trickster in First Nation's lore, Edgar Allen Poe)?

The common Raven is a very hardy, intelligent and tough bird. The Raven is found almost anywhere in Canada and doesn't leave for the winter like a lot of other birds in the list shown. This majestic bird is also very fierce and cunning. First Nations hold the Raven with high esteem in their mythology.
There is nothing more thrilling than to see a mated pair doing their aerobatic maneuvers.

Ravens are one of the only bird species that exhibit the act of play. Just like weekend warrior Canadians, ravens work hard and play hard!

The Raven would be a wonderful national Bird for Canada, because it is so intelligent, yet modest, and beautiful, not to mention majestic. The Raven was sacred to the First Nations peoples, and in my view is an excellent candidate...

Their range and resorfulness seem unbowded, a storied history and of spiritual significance

Ravens and crows are amongst the most intelligent birds. Just like Canadians are among people!

The raven is very intelligent and industrious, much like Canadians.

This bird is extremely smart, as are all corvids. It has a long association with our First Nations people by whom it was revered, and like all good Canadians handles the winter with ease!

Look at the map, people! This is the most integrated bird in the WHOLE country. It's also the most intelligent, wise bird of all. It also connects us all together, from immigrants, residents,first nations. What more could we want? Leave the eagle out of this, he has his own problems.

Raven, with its importance to the First Nations people as the creator of the world is already an iconic animal beautifully depicted in their many art styles. It has some negative connotations in being a carrion bird (remember Benjamin Franklin's opposition to the bald eagle for that reason - he favoured the turkey), but is also an heraldic symbol of divine providence. The raven's call evokes a lonely feeling evoking the vastness of the quiet boreal rainforest. Mysterious and lofty, ravens among the cleverest of birds and excellent survivors. Their jet plumage makes their image one that is easily included in any design. Any other bird would be a second-rate choice for Canada and First Nations' people. Just ask the Yukon.

I could go on, but really if there is not yet a round of nodding as the realization that the raven is objectively the best choice then there is not much I can do to help.

Their range and resourcefulness seem unbounded, a storied history and of spiritual significance.

The Common Raven survives in many environments and is adaptable. It can imitate others and is known as the trickster and is above all playful. It is a joyful, loud raucous bird and although common it is a wonderful role model for Canadians.

Je vote pour le Grand corbeau pour les mêmes raison évoquées par Fjola Hastings (Etobicoke, ON) :
1 - Partout au Canada incluant les Territoires.
2- Très débrouillard.
3- S'accouple pour la vie
4- Démontre des traits humains
5- Très beau

Merci.

"The Raven is found everywhere in Canada including the Territories ( this is important} we should have a national bird that exists in all of Canada and not just in a few places. The Raven is also extremely clever - can make its own tools to obtain food (this is highly unusual). Mates for life and also shows some human traits. The Raven is also a very attractive bird. I don't claim to know too many birds but I don't think there are too many birds that have all these qualities. Thank you."

The raven is an intelligent, resourceful, social, beautiful bird. They live in Canada year round. They're large and everyone has seen them. They are perhaps more common in northern parts of Canada and rural areas - that is, iconic Canadian places.

It must be the raven in order to recognize the First Nations, and the importance of this bird to them. It is also a highly intelligent bird.

Ravens are a vibrant part of First Nations legends and a thrill to see across the country. Not to mention they're incredibly intelligent birds!

I echo what many people already have said: the raven is found all across Canada, it is such an intelligent bird, beautiful to look at in its severity and yet has a very good sense of humour.

The raven, while not specific to Canada, is quite universal here, while bird like the Atlantic Puffin while being pretty specific to Canada, Not really relatable to anyone except the far East Coast.

The Raven has always been a big part of Canada, including in Aboriginal culture, something that should definitely be represented when choosing a national anything.

Due to the extensive familiarity and history of the Raven in Canada, I believe it should be the national bird.

Unless you've seen a raven shake off its' layer of hoar-frost in the gloom of a -40 degree arctic mid-morning, you've not seen a REALLY Canadian bird!

Smart, curious and crafty...just like Canadians.

Smart, revered by the natives, fantastic flyers.

The Raven - quite simply it is a rugged bird found throughout Canada and stays with us every day of the year. The Raven is Canadian in July and is Canadian in January. How could elect a bird that only lives in Canada for a few months?!!! And the Raven is a resident from sea to shining sea. Does our symbol need to be beautiful or have a nice song or even taste good? No. It needs to be Canadian.

for me it was a toss up between the Great Blue Heron and the Raven. I wanted the Canadian Official Bird to be a bird that appears across most of Canada. So I did not choose a bird that was specific to the north or to the eastern provinces.

Supposedly there are loons on Vancouver Island, however I have never heard a loon in my life other than on TV.

So I finally chose the raven. It is mostly all across Canada, other than southern Saskatchewan. They are smart, they are scavengers, they are survivors and they talk. Just like Canadians do.

Simple: the common raven is clever, loyal, a good parent, respectable, principled - all qualities I like in fellow Canadians. I also feel the first nations connection is very important, and honoring the raven, honors many aboriginal communities.

It is one of the only birds that lives year round in every province and territory. I wouldn't vote for a bird that won't stick around in the season that defines this county.

A bird esteemed by natives, thought to be intelligent and mischievous, but it is not a raptor. It can mimic humans (maybe even our prime minister) and it is native and rare. Too bad it is not as cute as a snowy owl or a loon, otherwise it would be a sure winner.

A bird often labelled dull, unarticulated but so misunderstood. Among the smartest bird species in the world and quite elegant. Also like Canadians very hardy! It survives multitude of environments and nutritional differences and never waivers. It can pick a fight but knows when it's on over its head too (group of black birds chase them away a lot). This bird really is amazing and when you look past its mean demeanour and potential rough image, it is quite elegant.

Ravens always get the last word! And my vote.

A bird found in all provinces solitary and independent somewhat majestic a bird of the bush and forest, mostly in the north. Trying to relate it to human qualities - but fail totally. What bird would want to emulate a human? What human qualities would a bird consider acceptable? Perhaps greed, which brings to mind Herring Gull.

The Common Raven is one of the most intelligent animals on the planet. They are found everywhere in Canada, INCLUDING THE NORTH. They are scavengers, which makes them beneficial in an ecological way. It's black plumage is modest, but beautiful.

I would suggest that the raven is the only clear choice because of its importance in native Canadian mythology coast-to-coast. The raven has a central role in the creation of Canada (turtle island), the creation of the brilliance of a moonlit night in winter (raven steals the light) and the development of the playfulness of the Canadian character (raven as trickster)

You can see the raven in all his glory in so much of Canadian art. For example, the steersman in Bill Reid's "Black Canoe" which adorns the Canadian embassy in Washington.

Geographically, the raven can be seen across our great country. I have been awakened by the on lake and rivers in Ontario's north, BC's interior, the Yukon and the Northwest territories. This proud and majestic bird has led me deep into the heart and soul of this country and symbolizes the strength and character of all Canadians.

Odin's bird, appropriate for a northern country.

I would suggest that the raven is the only clear choice because of its importance in native Canadian mythology coast-to-coast. The raven has a central role in the creation of Canada (turtle island), the creation of the brilliance of a moonlit night in winter (raven steals the light) and the development of the playfulness of the Canadian character (raven as trickster)

You can see the raven in all his glory in so much of Canadian art. For example, the steersman in Bill Reid's "Black Canoe" which adorns the Canadian embassy in Washington.

Geographically, the raven can be seen across our great country. I have been awakened by the on lake and rivers in Ontario's north, BC's interior, the Yukon and the Northwest territories. This proud and majestic bird has led me deep into the heart and soul of this country and symbolizes the strength and character of all Canadians.

I love Ravens. They are intelligent and humorous to watch. Ravens are found all over Canada. I feel they would be a great national bird for us. They remind me of what' it's like to be Canadian. Smart, resilient, well traveled, clever, and loyal to the area they claim.

The smartest of all birds.

The raven symbolizes the true wildness of Canada.

Raven is like we. Ever watching ever waiting, living for now, remembering when. Raven is me

The common raven is a bird that is seen almost everywhere. When going out and about throughout the day, it is a bird that is seen daily. These birds are very smart and are social in there own way. They are alot like the average Canadian and socialize and like to be together.

Been all across Canada , raven is everywhere I been!

The raven is resourceful, smart, can easily survive a Canadian winter, loud and proud, has a First Nation tie-in, and even has a university behind it (Carleton). They are all over Canada. And you know when a raven is around: he announces himself and holds nothing back.

A smart, tough, bird renowned for it's cleverness.. It's a year long citizen of Canada and is hearty enough to endure our elements. Revered by aboriginals and those of European descent. Truly a great representation of canadians in this day and age.

Strong links to first peoples' legends, and they are pretty smart.

The intelligence, the fortitude, the resilience and self reliance. And it exists all over Canada.

Ravens are the quintessential Canadian bird. They don't mind winter, are smart, resourceful, and a bit mischievous. Unlike many other nominated birds, their range covers most of Canada. They are recognizable by everyone (although, sadly some confuse them with crows)and generally admired for their ability to enjoy life and make the most of trying circumstances.

The raven is a bird that is known in all of Canada. It is an understated bird - no fancy feathers on him - but he speaks to our history and to our culture. The Raven features in the mythology of many of Canada's first nations and is renowned for being smart and crafty. It would make an excellent choice for the national bird.

Ravens are intelligent and adaptable.. They teach their offspring how to adapt to changing environments.They are mythological tricksters. I see them as the wisdom of this vast beauty of Canada

My husband and I have travelled throughout Canada over the years and everywhere we have gone there has always been a Raven, they vary in size and personality, we have come to appreciate there originality and feel they are very representive of Canada because of there presence everywhere.

The common raven can be described as. Bird that can fit into any story that can be told about Canada.'s survival
From it Indigenous culture, to its traditional politics ie the trickster , to today's science that can demonstrate its evolution of language, and problem solving.

Raven is intelligent and has long been connected with First Nations peoples.

The Raven can be found almost everywhere in Canada with the exception of the lower Prairie Provinces. The Raven is a significant animal in the folklore, stories and myths of Aboriginal Peoples of Canada.

The raven is simply another name for the mugwump, the bird which most clearly epitomizes the Canadian character . The mugwump sits on a fence with its mug on one side and its wump on the other. So Canadian.

intelligent, ubiquitous, resourceful and, at times, very, very irritating.

They may not be glamourous, but the enterprising, adaptable, devilish and instantly recognizable raven seems like the perfect choice to be Canada's national bird. I was once confused by some loud noises coming from the roof of my parents' house in Victoria: it was a pair of ravens banging nuts against the roof tiles to crack them open. This is the kind of cooperation and ingenuity that I can get behind!

I believe the raven would make a good choice for Canada's National Bird because of all the Native American Folklore surrounding it. It is a very intelligent bird and excellent at adapting to its surroundings.

Intelligent, social and vocal. Just like me :)

Actually, a year-round bird found throughout Canada. Important and sacred to first nations people. Wise, independent and beautiful. Able to withstand the elements. A real Canadian bird.

Given the prominence of the raven in many First Nations traditional stories, it would be a fitting choice for a national bird.

I feel this would be a nod to our native people.

Ravens are beautiful, their feathers glisten in the sun. They are bright, playful & mischievous. And they can withstand our harsh winters.

I'm entering my vote for the Common Raven for the Songbirds category because of its high intelligence and great flying abilities, and because it's well known as 'the trickster' in indigenous cultures that still live here, and have lived here for hundreds of thousands of years. And, that throaty croak will let you know if all is well while you're hiking in the great Canadian outdoors.

Ravens, birds that play. They're smart, resourceful and they are survivors. I have been amazed to watch them play, to see them flip upside down as they fly, to watch them fly over the crest of a hill over and over again on a windy day and shoot into the air just for fun. They have personality. Ravens have my vote.

When the snow flies, the raven comes out to play. In the less human-touched areas of Canada, ravens keep watch over everything from the trees, summer or winter. Ravens feature in many First Nations tales. Ravens have proven themselves to be smart birds, talkative, good memory and use of tools to get what they want. They are a strong bird, a survivor. So we have a smart bird who has learned to survive well in the Canadian wilderness, has been here at least as long as our first people and who still knows how to play. A good icon, I think.

I believe the Raven should be Canada's national bird for a few reasons.

The Raven is found everywhere in Canada including the Territories ( this is important}; we should have a national bird that exists in all of Canada and not just in a few places. The Raven is also extremely clever - can make its own tools to obtain food (this is highly unusual). Mates for life and also shows some human traits. The Raven is also a very attractive bird. I don't claim to know too many birds but I don't think there are too many birds that have all these qualities. Thank you.

For all of the reasons cited previously here, plus for their kind and helpful nature, I would be honoured to have the Raven as our country's national bird.

Ubiquitous, the only Canadian bird I know of that you can find coast-to-coast-to-coast in Canada in any season. Resilient and intelligent, a true survivor.

Found in every part of the country this smart, resourceful, yet playful bird best represents us from sea to sea to sea!

Caw.

I put the Raven in the suggestions before reading the list. Sorry.

To me the Raven is the bird that tours and protects Canada's North. When in the Arctic or the northern part of the provinces you will always see Ravens cruising the skies or just sitting watching over the land and people, summer and winter.

In both both artwork and stories from our aboriginal people you will always find the Raven.

This is a very intelligent and beautiful bird that shows what Canada should be about.

Easily the finest example of bird intelligence, as well an indisputable show of memory as proven year after year when the Raven returns to us for our offerings of peanuts in a shell. The Raven is strong, resilient, brave, intelligent, reliable, and beautiful. How can he not be Canada's National Bird?

A raven which will live in my memory forever is one that landed in a tree outside the courtroom window. He shook his feathers out to a rough robe. Forty below is a mere pas de qua to a raven.

Ravens are smart, funny and playful. Their aerobatics are something to stop and watch.

A raven, which can survive Canada's weather, is a tough bird. Imagine how much roadkill there would be without them. However, there will be considerably fewer ravens killed by trucks once the lookout learns to say "Troc" as well as "Caw."

Ravens are majestic, intelligent, royal birds with a posture that shows their power and confidence. They are fun and they are tough big guys.

I once shook a stick at some. I didn't hit any but they apparently decided it was a good game. When I got home, there were six sitting on the back fence awaiting me.

I pick the raven because it is so prevalent around Canada, and as far as I know does not migrate south for the winter.

They are also a glorious, big black bird, make many different calls and seem to have a playful nature, at times flying and playing with each other in wind currents.

Found throughout and stays all year. This an amazing bird - their flight, calls and resourcefulness. They hang around near people so you get to see them a lot.

Supremely intelligent. A constant watcher and companion of people's activities - recreational or industrial - as it scavenges our scraps. Its rich, soft-spoken but echoing "croak," an iconic accompaniment to the whispering peace of our great forests. Its playful expressions unforgettable and engaging. The raven's historical significance is profound.

Here in B.C., as soon as you get off the beaten path into the wilderness, you're in raven country. I love watching them fly, hear them call each other, or spot them perched on a tree top. Fantastically smart birds!

Canadians are tough; we need a bird that doesn't cut and run at the first sign of winter.

Canada has only one bird that can be found throughout the whole country, at all times of the year: the common raven.

Family oriented, intelligent, vocal, tough, recognizable, enjoys flight and has a sense of humour. What more can one ask for in a National Bird?

The common raven is well represented in all Canadian provinces and territories. It's an intelligent, social and playful bird that gives observers endless hours of enjoyment.

My second choice would be the gray jay, also widespread across the country and mostly confined to Canada.

I see a lot of votes for the lack-caped chickadee. A fine little bird, but it is not well represented in the North (especially Nunavut, N.W.T., northern Quebec and Labrador).

I've traveled this whole country now. And being an avid birder for years, I take notice of what I see around me. That also means what I see around me all year round, like I see other Canadians that stay here and endure our hard winters.

I've finally had the opportunity to spend the last two winters in Nunavut, which also is very much part of Canada, although some of us in the south seem to forget that fact.

Last summer I was happy to see lots of different birds that came North for the summer to breed, but there was only one that stayed come winter.

That was the raven.

In a bleak, open, hostile snow desert with cold and unrelenting wind, it was wonderful to see these birds. Larger than most but maybe it was Darwin that figured out long ago that the strongest survive. Well, these wonderful birds are strong.

Not a tree in sight, it's amazing to see them perched on anything at hand, surveying the land for the next meal.

I vote for the raven. Canada's real snowbird.

I love many of the other proposed birds for Canada's symbol. The goose, birds of prey, and so on. But the raven - now we have a bird that represents the breadth and depth of Canada. It's a bird of mystery, with deep mythological and cultural importance, as others have written. In my childhood on Vancouver Island, local lore was that ravens could imitate people very skillfully, and possibly lure you into danger. It has a very musical voice, not a songbird voice, but very pleasant all the same. Unlike crows, raven has never lost its dignity. And anybody that has seen them fly knows that they are great fun lovers.

In winter when most other creatures are sleeping, hibernating or have moved to warmer climes, ravens not only remain, but breed. In the coldest month, February, ravens are nesting and raising their young. They are resourceful enough to find food for themselves and their young during this period, and to not only survive, but thrive. Like other species, Ravens sometimes travel great distances - some banded in Canada have been found in such distant locations as Russia, thousands of kilometres from where they were banded. These birds generally mate for life, are very intelligent and courageous and appear to have their own language. I've seen a raven attack a timber wolf carrying a hare, diving from on high and pecking the wolf on the head repeatedly until the wolf abandoned the hare and the raven made off with it. If a potential predator is spotted, the raven will call in others from the surrounding area to join in an attack, forcing the threatening creature to retreat. (Crows also do this.) They also appear to have play games, such as holding "hands" in flight and spinning each other around. Their intelligence and resourcefulness during all seasons makes this handsome bird a perfect choice as a Canadian symbol.

I vote for the raven because:
1. It is the most clever
2. It is found in all areas of Canada
3. It stays around in the winter
4. It is precocious
5. It is larger than song-birds
6. Unlike the crow or the mourning dove, it doesn't wake you up in the morning

In my mind the raven is so much connected with the original Canadian inhabitants that I would like it to continue representing our country.

Represents intelligence, humility, ingenuity and modesty.

Whoosh, whoosh, whoosh go the raven wings. Loud calls from the tree tops announce their presence. These are not shy birds. We know when they are present and they are so comfortable with themselves they keep their black cloak even when everything else turns white. They know who they are and are proud of it.

Raven coaxed the first people out of the clamshell. We might not be here if it were not for Raven. Ravens are found all across this great land.

As corvids they are exceedingly intelligent and clever. I would be happy to have the raven represent this great land of ours.

I voted for the common raven because it's in almost every corner of Canada, all year long. It's got such a great call - sounds like a person yelling. Most people know ravens, not just birders. And Raven hung the sun in the sky!

The national bird of Canada should be a bird that's here all year round. I see ravens all the time, and they are a very intelligent bird. Plus, they're so underrated, haha!

World's smartest bird, Raven is found in every corner of Canada. Raven is very important in First Nations' origin stories and mythology.

Noble, intelligent, found throughout Canada and a bold choice. Plus, it's not already a provincial official bird like the loon (Ontario) or the snowy owl (Quebec).

I love Noah Richler's essay.

I think the common raven would make a fantastic Canadian bird for many reasons. Some of my reasons for nominating this bird are: their intelligence, grace and acrobatics, along with the fact that they are a very common sight for many people across Canada. I feel that the national bird should be a bird that all the people across Canada can see, and not just a few people in one area (example: the puffin does not visit every part of Canada)

i voted for the raven because of its intelligence.

Since whiskey jack was not on the list, I believe that these birds are extremely intelligent and are found across Canada.

They resilient raven is as Canadian as any other animal, in that they survive the winter sustaining themselves where a weaker species would migrate or die. They live in the open, with no qualms about their own image, eating our leftovers.

They point out our short-comings by messing up our incredible amounts of litter like an overbearing mother letting you know your room is filthy and needs cleaning.

They are bigger than crows and can scare the daylights out of weaker beings.

The raven's piercing squall is not unlike the trash talk you would hear on any inner-city basketball court.

They take no flack from anyone or anything.

They are not seagulls.

To me, the raven is one of the most majestic and clever birds.

Ravens are sleek, powerful birds, and great problem solvers! They're also slightly terrifying. Ok, massively terrifying. Driving down a dirt road in the middle of winter, there's always a raven perched on a low wooden fence somewhere along that trip. When you see it, you know it's already seen you and is deciding on which of your most valued and protected body parts it would like to feast on first. Canada has been in the shadow of America for far too long, and we need a bird that can show us the real way to make it to the top! THE NORTH SHALL RISE AGAIN!

It's the obvious choice. The raven's range extends all the way across Canada. Corvids are well known for being extremely intelligent. The raven also features very prominently in the myths of our founding peoples, as a creator and trickster. Some may think that the raven is just far too interesting and cool to represent Canada, but it's time we shed that attitude.

I'll start by saying, full disclosure, I'm cool to the idea of a national bird. We already have a national animal and tree, and that's enough. Two is a good number of official emblems. More than that waters down their recognizability. Think of any province and I bet you'll be able to name AT MOST two emblems, like a bird and a flower or something. We don't need one for every class of life.

But if we are gonna pick a national bird, let's think about criteria.

First off, let's not risk a constitutional crisis by picking one that's already a provincial bird. That, right there, rules out loon, osprey, chickadee, puffin, sharp-tailed grouse and the big owls. (And yes I know ravens are the territorial bird of the Yukon. Territories don't have constitutional status like provinces so that's not a problem.)

Second, let's pick a bird that's widely distributed across Canada. It's bad enough we have one national emblem (sugar maple) that's limited to southeastern Canada, and I guess that's forgivable because as a symbol it predates the westward and northward expansion of the country, but let's be more inclusive this time by picking a nationwide bird. So that strikes down the seabirds, rock ptarmigan and whooping crane.

And while we're talking about range, how about a bird that's found across Canada year-round, instead of one that vacates large parts of the country in the winter? How can something be the Canadian national bird if many of them don't do Canadian winter? So that would eliminate geese, swans, hummingbirds, most of the raptors and some of the songbirds. In the case of the Canada goose, I frankly think most of the support comes from over-excitement about the name, like "OMG THE ORNITHOLOGISTS MENTIONED US!!" Also they smell bad.

Now with the list narrowed down a bit let's pick a bird that's culturally relevant to Canada, embodies some ideal we aspire to and is easily associated with the Canadian landscape.

The common raven fits all these criteria. It is not a provincial emblem. It is abundant in every province and territory 12 months a year. It figures prominently in the cultural symbolism and mythologies of various aboriginal peoples in different parts of the country. It is one of the most intelligent and socially sophisticated of birds, which is obviously a good value to spotlight. And the call of the raven is an experience shared by all who venture onto the Canadian landscape, whether on the rocky lakes of Algonquin Park, the rainforest of the Haida Gwaii or the barren tundra of Ellesmere Island.

Speaking of calls, ravens have a crazy number of different vocalizations. There's probably a point in there about diversity or bilingualism or something.

Thank you.

tldr: first choice nothing, second choice raven.

A strong, independent but sociable bird that lives everywhere in Canada.

Ubiquitous, even across the North.

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